Opiates Are Safe When Used as Prescribed…

… it’s the people who use them incorrectly AND DON’T FOLLOW THE RULES,  take more than is directed, and use them for emotional issues that get into trouble.    Those of us with chronic pain use them to do normal tasks (laundry, cook, housework, etc).  They can be a very safe and effective way to manage chronic pain when used as prescribed.  I’ve never heard of someone who takes something as prescribed who becomes an addict.  I worked drug and alcohol rehab as a detox RN- and every last one of the drug addicts used drugs inappropriately, and generally illegally- and forfeited normal life and relationships to get more of the drugs.   Those who use them as prescribed don’t do that.

https://www.webmd.com/pain-management/tc/safe-use-of-long-acting-opiates-topic-overview#1

Those who do not use opiates as prescribed are making a choice ( at least initially) to use them for non-medical issues (emotional).   They make a decision that makes them more vulnerable to addiction (not to be confused with tolerance or dependence).   Addiction involves emotional symptoms like cravings, and behavioral issues such as doing anything to get more, not maintaining relationships (personal, work, legal, etc), and in general disregards anything in their  life in order to maintain drug use, eventually violating the law to maintain/obtain  drug supply, or type of drugs used (heroin is cheaper and easier to get than many prescriptions due to changes in availability and MD’s willingness to prescribe them).

What are the differences between addiction, tolerance, and dependence?  A LOT of people become tolerant or dependent on various types of meds but aren’t necessarily addicted.   Tolerance is the body’s getting used to a dosage, and then needing more to get the same effect- but that isn’t the same as addiction.  Dependence is the body getting used to a medication in their body, and when that medication is discontinued, they need to do so gradually to avoid withdrawal symptoms- there aren’t  emotional ‘needs’ to keep getting the med, and it’s not the same as addiction.    Addiction ALWAYS includes emotional and behavioral components.

https://teens.drugabuse.gov/blog/post/tolerance-dependence-addiction-whats-difference

For those of us who live in chronic pain, all of the talk about the ‘opiate epidemic’ is terrifying.  We need the meds to have a normal life (to some degree).  There is no emotional or behavioral need for the pain killers- JUST the need to ease pain that has been verified by diagnostic testing.   For the government to tell physicians how to treat patients is bizarre.   For a personal physician to be limited in how to treat a patient he/she actually knows is cruel in many cases.  There are entire physician groups here where I live (associated with one of the local hospitals ) that are not allowed to prescribe opiates if they are general practitioners, or primary care docs.  How is that rational?   If there is a known cause for pain, why does someone have to see another doctor (specialist) to get pain relief- waiting weeks at times to get an appointment or test done?

I have a pain management doctor.   With degenerative joint disease, degenerative disc disease, carpal tunnel syndrome, TMJ, a knee that can’t be replaced because of a history of pulmonary emboli (blood clots in my lungs)- so I will NEVER surgical pain relief), fibromyalgia, renal insufficiency (so can’t take NSAIDs like ibuprofen), etc, opiates give me some relief and “enough” quality of life to live independently, and not wish I was dead.  I still have days when the opiate I take (as prescribed) isn’t enough.   I get spine and knee injections many times per year.  My pain doc has rules in order to be his patient.  He doesn’t changes doses over the phone.  No early refills.   Have to go to the office to get a paper prescription because of the type of meds he prescribes.   They do random urine tests to check for other meds. I like that he has rules- he’s not a pill mill or “Dr. Feelgood”.   He’s board certified in pain management.

Consider the population that is involved in the “opiate crisis”… they are rule breakers that have high risk consequences for high risk behaviors.  Addiction isn’t their fault, but getting treatment is their responsibility.   Restricting those who DO follow the rules is mean… and the suicide rate will increase among chronic pain patients who can’t get relief, even when they’re the ones who follow the rules.

Deal with the addicts- not “punish”  those who take pain meds as prescribed.  Those with chronic pain didn’t choose their physical conditions….addicts (in the beginning) choose to not follow the prescription instructions, and use meds for non-medical uses.   That’s not the problem of those who DO follow the instructions.

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Pain Management for the Non-addicted

Hydrocodone (Norco, Lortab, and Vicodin’s main ingredient) has been in the news a lot in the last few months.  People are dying from overdoses.  While that is very sad, it has created mayhem for those who take meds as directed.  Those who follow the rules are being ‘punished’ because of the actions of those who don’t (yes, I believe addiction is a disease, but there is a point in the beginning where using chemicals is a choice; genetics is said to load the gun, circumstance pulls the trigger, and the addict *at first* has their finger on the trigger… addiction doesn’t happen at literal gunpoint).

Hydrocodone has been moved from a schedule III to a schedule II.  That means that any refills must have a paper prescription- no getting phoned in refills.  Those with chronic pain must now go to the MD office and get the piece of paper to take to the pharmacy, then wait for the prescription to be filled, and then go back home.  That is ludicrous when someone hurts so much that leaving home for anything is painful.  My spine is collapsing, my discs are degrading, my thighs are shrinking from neuropathy, and I’ve got fibromyalgia.  I also have chronic headaches.  I’m in a lot of pain, more days than not. I don’t remember ‘pain-free’.   And now, I have to deal with the actions of people I have never met who have emotional issues that they use drugs I need to squelch.  Those people are now dictating my medical care.

Less than %6 of those who are prescribed opiates who TAKE THEM AS PRESCRIBED ever become addicted (Google it).  So, %94+ of those who need pain meds for chronic conditions are now subject to stricter rules because of those who use them for psychological reasons/pain.  I’ve had a prescription for one form of narcotic or another for almost 20 years.  I might take the meds for a few days and then take none for a couple of weeks.   I might take one pill on those days, or I might take two or three across the 24-hour period.  Depending on the type of pain I’m having, an extra gabapentin (seizure med also used in pain control) or even Excedrin will work better than the opiate.  Depending on the headache type, a triptan works much better than an opiate.  But on those days when narcotics are the only thing that will make it worth taking another breath so I can remind myself that it will ease up at some point, I shouldn’t have to pay for what an addict is doing.

Addicts are going to get their opiates (if that’s their drug of choice) no matter what.  I see this change in ‘rules’ driving more people to use herion or other illegally obtained drugs, and anticipate notable jumps in heroin deaths and overdoses over the next few years.  I already know of an entire medical group’s practice (for one entire hospital system here) that no longer allows primary care docs to prescribe pain meds because of this new change in the law (doctors already are monitored for how many prescriptions they write for narcotics, how many pills they give at a time, etc).  So the doc who knows the patient the best isn’t allowed to determine what is best for him/her.

My primary care doc  initially wasn’t comfortable in prescribing stronger  opiates when regular Vicodin (hydrocodone 5mg w/ acetaminophen 500mg) wasn’t working (after the discontinuation of Darvocet, which was effective), so I went to see a board certified pain management doctor.  Once I had a ‘system’ of what med to use when, she was then OK with prescribing, so I could have one doctor prescribing the vast majority of my prescriptions (my neurologist is the only other one), using one local pharmacy, and one mail-order pharmacy.

I have worked as a detox RN in a treatment center.  I ‘get’ that drug addiction is a disease.  I have a great deal of empathy for those who are in treatment and making positive changes in their lives.  But their inability to handle meds should not determine my medical care.  What someone else can’t control shouldn’t create issues for MY doctor when I am able to take meds as prescribed, and have for two decades (for chronic pain).  Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is the leading cause of liver failure in this country…. why isn’t that scheduled (or withdrawn from the market)?  Alcohol-related deaths can take out entire families at a time w/drunk driving- should we have licenses for buying booze?  Why are those with legitimate, documented medical disorders that cause pain made to ‘pay’ for those who don’t use the meds as directed?

My primary care doc and pain management doc (who I only see sporadically at this point) know me better than the DEA does.  My pharmacist can vouch for no hinky requests for refills.  I’ve never shown up in an ER asking for pain meds.  I don’t crave narcotics.  I don’t take larger doses, or more frequent doses than are prescribed.  I follow the rules.  And now, especially with winter approaching, I will have to go pick up a piece of paper (getting in and out of the car is painful in the summer, let alone the cold) which, until October 6,2014, was done by phone between pharmacy and the doc’s office.  I had to go every three months to be re-evaluated (which still stands), which isn’t a bad thing.  I don’t think pain meds should be thrown around as if they are insignificant… but  addiction isn’t my problem.  Pain is.  There is a huge difference.  I don’t even let myself get to the point of physical tolerance (when someone takes something as prescribed, and the body becomes used to it being there… withdrawal symptoms can happen if the med is abruptly stopped- and that is not the same as addiction).  There is a gross lack of awareness between addiction, dependence, abuse, and tolerance- and I think that applies to policy-makers as well.

No law is going to save people from themselves if they either don’t want to be saved, or don’t see that they have a problem.  They might not ‘get it’ on the first run through rehab or 12-step meetings… but those who keep at recovery will eventually get there, and be clean.

 

For those who are now in a position of not having a physician who will prescribe pain meds (whether from fear, ignorance, or restrictions from his/her employer- you may not know why they have changed their policies), here are some tips from an RN of nearly 30 years, who has taken care of addicts, chronic pain patients, and lives with chronic pain:

1.  See ONLY a board certified pain management doctor for pain control.  They often have ‘rules’ such as random drug screens, no dosage change over the phone, limits as to how many months before actually making an in-person appointment (vs. picking up the prescription from the desk), etc. Do NOT see a doc who asks how you will pay, writes a prescription, and has a line around the block…. Do. Not. Go. There.   😮

2.  Use only one pharmacy (two ONLY if you also get meds from a mail-order pharmacy for other chronic conditions).  Let your doctors know which pharmacy you use, and offer to get copies of records if they want them.  Pharmacies are bound by HIPAA (privacy laws), and might not be able to tell the doc asking what other docs have prescribed (if someone from the same practice is on call, they probably can, since they are acting on your regular doc’s behalf for you).

3.  Don’t dramatize pain.  Tell the doctor where the pain is, how bad it is, when it is better, when it is worse, what helps, and what makes it escalate.  You may have pain for the rest of your life- don’t wear out the extreme descriptions when you have 30-65 or more years to describe it.  Sometimes letting your doctor know what the pain keeps you from doing is helpful…. those pain scales are kind of useless for chronic pain.  But, if you tell your doctor that when it’s moderate, you have to postpone laundry, or if it’s moderately severe, you have to cancel appointments, that can give better information for chronic pain.  It’s way different than acute pain.

4.  Agree to get tests done to more clearly identify what is causing pain.  If you refuse to get diagnostic tests done, that can indicate that you know that nothing is going to show up.  Not all disorders show up on tests, but working with your doctor when they want more information via testing will go a long way.

5.  NEVER change doses or frequency without talking to the doctor who prescribed the pain meds (or any meds, for that matter), unless you have been given specific instructions.   There are some pain meds that have a very narrow window between effective dose and the dose that will cause you to stop breathing.

6.   Don’t ever forget the good parts of your life.  You are not defined by your pain or any other medical conditions.  You decide if you are happy or not.  You decide if you focus on nothing else.  I know that there are days (and sometimes weeks) when you really can’t focus on anything else for much of the time… but when you can, take advantage of those days and be thankful for your pets, family, friends, the ability  to still work (I’d give just about anything to still be working as an RN), your interests, etc.  Your attitude is completely in your control, even if nothing else seems to be.   😉  ❤

Intervention and Treatment Memories

I gained a lot of weight during the time I was on chemo for leukemia.  It’s been very hard to get rid of it, as I’m also perimenopausal, and limited physically as far as what activity I can safely do.  Add a history of eating disorders, and the idea of losing weight is actually rather frightening at times.  I guess in some ways that’s good, since I don’t take for granted how bad things got the last time I relapsed in 1995-1996.  It took years to put my life back together so I could eat normally, and longer than that before I could accept my body without being disgusted by it.  My oncologist told me just to be thankful I’m alive (which I am), and don’t focus so much on the weight.   Easier said than done.

The last time I started to relapse coincided with being diagnosed as diabetic, and suddenly having to account for everything that passed by my lips. I lost about 50 pounds over several months prior to, and after being diagnosed (not noticeably abnormal ), and was holding my own without any eating disorder behaviors (purging- laxatives were my vice, restricting, excessive exercise, etc).  I ended up with pneumonia later that year (November 1995), and lost quite a bit of weight in a few days, and the sensation of being ’empty’ and seeing the scale numbers drop was enough to trigger the old eating disorder stuff that started when I was in my late teens and twenties (early 80s).  I’d been free of the anorexic end of things for many, many years.  It didn’t take long for being around food to cause anxiety, and for numbers on the scale, calorie books, and blood sugar meters to drive my entire life.  I lost another 50 pounds in about three months.  Other people noticed.

I worked at a drug and alcohol treatment center as a detox RN (and weekend charge nurse of sorts- if anything was wacky on campus, I had the last word if it was OK or not, though with serious stuff, I had plenty of folks to call for feedback and input) , so my coworkers were very aware of what addictive behavior looked like.  And denial.  And refusal to listen to rational feedback.  I coasted for a bit, but by the time a formal intervention was done, I was in bad shape.  Eating anything was excruciating.  Every night, I was asking God to just let me wake up in the morning.  And I literally crawled up the stairs to and inside my apartment.  Chunks of skin fell off of my heels.  Things weren’t good.

The day of the intervention was on the day after having worked a double shift.  I got off at 7 a.m. and went to rest for a while in one of the cabins my coworker had (she lived a few counties away and stayed on campus when she worked- we worked weekends and Mondays) while she went to do some discharge summaries, which I planned to do as well once I got some rest.  She came and got me at around noon, and asked me to come with her to get something to drink, and also drop off something in the Operations Director’s office.

I never saw it coming.  Inside the Operations Director’s office were my boss, her husband (who also worked there with the clinical staff), the medical director, day charge nurse, and several other people, including clinical staff who I worked with as well. There were 8-10 people there.  When I saw them all in the office, I knew what was going on.  I was terrified, but also wanted to stop fighting the wars in my head over something as ‘stupid’ as food.  It’s never about food, but that was what was going on mentally.  I was told of the plan to take me directly to my apartment to pack (supervised), then driven to the San Antonio International Airport to be put on a plane.  Someone would take care of my dog (that’s a whole different story), and my car could stay on campus where it could be monitored.  I’d fly to Houston, where an outreach employee would meet me, and be sure I got on the flight to Los Angeles.  That was the only way I’d be allowed to come back to work. What I hadn’t told them was that my primary doc had told me that I probably wouldn’t last a month, tops, if I continued as I was.  Their timing was perfect.  I wouldn’t have been ready before then.

So, off to Los Angeles I went.  Scared to death… I knew they made people EAT in eating disorder treatment.   But, I figured the sooner I got with the program, the sooner I’d get out of there.  So, in a feeble way, I’d begun to surrender on the plane.  By the time I got there, I was so exhausted from the double shift, then the intervention, traveling, etc, that the guy who picked me up thought I’d OD’d on something that made me semi-coherent.   I was just flat-out tired, and told him I was there for not eating (I never looked like I was starving as much as I was- curds of cottage cheese were something I worried about).  I was also exhausted from the battle fatigue from what had been going on in my head for months.  I’d been ‘confronted’ a couple of weeks earlier by a former coworker from another place I worked, about my weight (she was dropping off her child for treatment), and she asked if there was anything wrong with me.  I didn’t know how to answer.  It didn’t register that losing fifty pounds would be visible to anyone.  Seriously.  That jarred me a bit, but the intervention had the biggest impact.

I went to the treatment center in California (they no longer ‘do’  eating disorder treatment, thank God), and it was horrible.  The facilities were pleasant, and the food was really good (which amazed me, since I didn’t like much of anything, but all of the fresh produce ALL THE TIME was great) !  A few of the staff were decent, but eating disorder treatment it was not.  And the primary ‘assigned’ therapist I had was bad news… I was not allowed to speak about some things that seemed therapy-worthy to me. The ED patients had a table segregated from other patients in the dining room (and we were often like an exhibit in a zoo for the other patients who wanted to see if we ate), and one OA meeting a week (otherwise we went to AA).  That was the ED program. They may have been great for chemical dependency and/or dual diagnosis, but I was a generic eating disorder NOS (not otherwise specified) patient.  They didn’t get that right either.

When I first got there, I was so weak that when I went on the ‘beach walk’, I could barely make it.  Walking in the sand was exhausting, and I was having a lot of trouble even keeping a visual on the rest of the bunch who opted to do that activity.  My jeans were falling off, so they gave me a trash bag to tie two belt loops together, then trimmed the excess so it didn’t violate the safety rules about plastic bags.

The day before I was sent there, I’d packed up a detox patient to go there for more dual diagnosis issues than we generally dealt with at our facility, and then I showed up as a patient. Surprised her !   We sort of stuck like glue together, trying to make sense of the place.  Then another patient, AND person who worked where I worked showed up… They were both dumbfounded about the detox and treatment  process (so had a lot of questions), but come to find out one hadn’t told them all of the things she’d been taking. I told her she needed to fess up for her own safety.  They’d come to me (their former nurse) before talking to the staff there.  I wasn’t licensed in CA, and I was off the clock out there- but I was glad to be of some support.  We all needed each other out there.

There were a few of us ED patients, and we stuck together between groups, wondering where the ED services in the brochure were.  But, I managed to survive 36 days out there. The last 10 days, I had a virus of some sort, and wasn’t allowed to participate in any groups or meetings (but wasn’t sent home). They’d taken me to an ER, where they had me pee in a cup, and then decided I had a BLOOD virus- from a pee test…  The group would literally come to my room at the end of the session to say hello.  I could go outside and sit in the sun (or smoke), but no activities anyone else was doing. I could go to the dining room with everyone else, so it wasn’t like they were worried about me giving bugs to someone… but whatever.   I had a few roommates, some ED and one alcoholic,  (at different times) who were nice enough.  But I left there feeling totally unprepared for going home and making it OK.  I had no aftercare.  I was more scared leaving than when I got there.  But it was a great motivator to not want to ever end up in another situation like that was.

One really funny thing happened one evening, during my ‘banishment’ from groups, when I was outside  smoking.   One of the techs (fondly called the ‘clipboard jockeys’) came running around the corner asking if I’d seen the REST OF THE PATIENTS.  All of them !  😮  I told him no, and he was sure I must know something, even though I wasn’t allowed in groups. I really didn’t know. Come to find out that the rest of the patients were doing the evening community group, and after the tech checked everybody off of his clipboard, they went to another room to mess with him, and hide.  Eventually, all showed up, and the tech laughed, but I can imagine the thoughts going through his head about how he’d lost the entire lot of patients, except the puny one not allowed to go to groups.   That would have been a serious pile of incident reports and phone calls.

In the meantime I’d been told that I would NOT be allowed back to work where I’d been working at the time of the intervention until the director of nurses OK’d it (she had some serious boundary issues, and was also a neighbor of mine who had been in contact with my therapist in the treatment center- acting like some sort of information verifier.  The treatment center wouldn’t let me talk about being raped until my boss had reported to them that it had actually happened when she found the info and news clippings in my apartment when I was gone). Anyway,   I really liked that job, so that was a huge loss until I showed I was doing well enough to come back.   Eventually, I did get to go back, and stayed another couple of years until things started feeling unsafe with a huge increase in census, and no changes in detox/nursing staffing for several months.    But I’ll always be incredibly thankful that I got to work in that facility.  I learned a lot, and am a better nurse for my experiences there.  I still am in contact with several people I worked with there.

The intervention likely saved my butt, even though I had a lot of work to do ON MY OWN when I got back.  I got every professional book on EDs I could find, and did an ‘as if’ thing.   I looked at what I needed to do ‘as if’ I were carrying out orders for one of my patients.  I had to detach for a while.  Eventually, I was able to make it about me, and feel like I was doing OK. (The one OA meeting/group in town was ‘lead’ by someone who brought specific diets to show to the group- nothing 12-step about it, so I passed).  Whenever I see the show ‘Intervention’ or someone getting nailed on Dr. Phil, it brings back a lot.  Interventions are terrifying, but there was also a huge sense of relief at not having to go it alone any longer.

For those who think it might happen to them, just go with it.  Let everybody talk, and then be thankful that you don’t have to get well by yourself, and it doesn’t have to be perfect.  One step at a time, even if they’re baby steps.  A slip doesn’t have to become a relapse.  It beats being tied to an addiction that wants to kill you !  Things can get better, IF you are willing to let someone nudge you on your way (feels like an emotional sledge hammer, but in retrospect, it’s more of a send-off to the rest of your life 🙂 ).

Chronic Pain in Its Various Forms…and Dysautonomia

While I’ve lost count of the exact number of days, this current ‘spell’ of severe headaches has gone on for at least 4-5 weeks, with maybe five or six days of no headaches at all in any given day.  Of course, it isn’t ‘just’ a headache.  I get the dreaded nausea along with it.   There have been times during most days when the pain lessens, but most of the time it’s there.  Today has been pretty bad- I’m taking a chance by blogging, since the scrolling on a page can make things worse, but I have to ‘talk’ to someone.

I e-mailed my primary doc about changing the nausea meds. After several years on Compazine, it seems it’s lost its touch. The leftover Zofran (from chemotherapy for leukemia) doesn’t do much anymore, either.  She called in some Phenergan for me.  The pharmacy didn’t have the full 90-day supply available, but my dad brought me the 12 pills they had. They will call when the rest of it is available.  I was just so thankful to get anything that may offer a bit of relief from something.

I’ve been trying various ‘schedules’ of different pain meds, from different over-the-counter pain killers (Excedrin, Aleve) to a weaker  prescription med (tramadol) to a stronger prescription med (Norco 10/325).  None of it is working.   I even did a ‘bad’ thing today before taking any other prescription meds (so no risk of interactions) and took some methadone that I have leftover from a while back. It isn’t working, and I’m not willing to take another dose before talking to my pain management doctor.  He’s a board certified pain management doc, and not a ‘doctor feel-good’.  He has ‘rules’, which I respect.  I don’t want a doc who calls things in over the phone without assessing me.  I don’t want the drugs per se. I want less pain.  I don’t expect to ever be pain free, but I would like a lesser degree of pain.

Pain-free isn’t a realistic expectation with degenerative disc disease, degenerative joint disease, fibromyalgia, bulging discs (neck),  diabetic nerve pain,  and chronic headaches.  I’m just looking for a degree of relief that keeps me able to take care of the basic chores around home, and keeps me able to do some ‘minimal’  fun activities, such as watching a movie on TV, playing some online games, playing with my puppy, or other such forms of distraction and entertainment.  The last time I talked to my pain doc, we talked about the nature of degenerative disorders… they don’t get better by definition.  The fibromyalgia and headaches are just ‘bonus’ disorders 😦

I have to be careful about pain in regards to the dysautonomia, as well.  Pain is one of my major ‘triggers’ for heart rate and blood pressure changes that can land me on the floor, passed out.  Those who have severe menstrual cramps that cause lightheadedness and feeling ‘faint’ go through something that is essentially a result of the same thing- vasovagal nerve stimulation.  Vasovagal syncope (fainting) is fairly common. But any sort of fainting is a risk for injury.  And injury is a risk for further mobility limitations. I can’t risk that.  I want to continue to live on my own, and I can’t afford help (nor do I want someone hovering over me). Side effects of many pain meds also increase the risk of lowered blood pressure.  I have to keep that in mind with any new medication, as the interactions with the other meds I take can be risky.  I ‘ground’ myself to home when I am put on any new meds, just to be sure I’m not caught off guard at the grocery store or pharmacy (about the only places I go) with some drop in blood pressure from a new med not playing nicely with something else I’m on.

I’m going to have to go see my pain management doctor soon, to discuss a different plan.  I’ve been on stronger meds before, but have asked to go back on weaker meds, knowing that this is a lifelong thing, and I need options for the future.  For the degenerative disorders, spine surgery and another knee replacement are likely down the line, as well as hip replacements. I want to postpone those as long as possible. 😮  There is the possibility of having some sort of pain-nerve impulse thingie implanted (I need to read more about that).  I’m not all that gung ho about ‘stuff’ being put into my body that involves hardware.  I’m hoping that the weight loss with Nutrisystem will also help my knees and hips… my spine is a wreck from neck to bum, so weight loss will be good, but not a ‘fix’.

Methadone scares me. And, today, it’s not working.  But, it might be something I have to try more regularly to get a final ‘verdict’ as far as its real efficacy.  I’m also very reluctant to take methadone after working drug/alcohol rehab, and seeing how it is THE worst in terms of withdrawal. Those patients made heroin detox look like a cakewalk – and heroin addicts had it bad enough.  I understand that I wouldn’t be taking it for illegal drug replacement, and that chronic pain patients who take medications as prescribed are highly unlikely to develop true addiction (different than physical tolerance or physical dependence).  Only %3-5 of patients who take pain medications as prescribed go on to become addicted (which includes the strong psychological components of the ‘high’, cravings, etc). Ninety-five to ninety-seven percent of us don’t become addicted.  The ‘tolerance’ and dependence may require dosage adjustments.  That’s not because of addiction, but the physical acclimation of the body to the medication.  It gets used to the drug being there, and requires dosage changes to continue to provide pain relief.  I don’t like that, but I understand it.

I’ve also been on the fentanyl patch.  I don’t remember it being all that great at the dose I was on, but it might be something else that is considered.  The nice thing about ‘the patch’ was a continuous release of medication, so no ups and downs depending on me taking another dose.  It was also not hard to stop taking.  That has huge ‘benefit’ written all over it.  When I wanted to go off of it, I was weaned down to lower dose patches, and then given pain pills to taper off of the narcotics altogether- no withdrawal symptoms, and it didn’t take that long.

For ‘breakthrough pain’ on either methadone or fentanyl (or the current Norco), I’ve taken tramadol.  It’s not as likely to interact with the stronger narcotics or create an increased risk for respiratory depression (which is essentially what causes death in drug overdoses- accidental or otherwise).  It’s not a great pain killer, but it can take the edge off of the joint, muscle, and head pain that is getting worse.  Things like ibuprofen and naproxen sodium have limited use with the headaches and fibromyalgia.  They do help with the joint and disc disease to some degree, with no neurological or cardiovascular effects.  Worth having around  and taking !

I’ve tried physical therapy, chiropracters, Imitrex (which helped somewhat), heat (but that triggers the dysautonomia), cold, TENS unit, various pillows, and stuff to unclog my sinuses.  If I thought chewing on the siding of my house would help, I’d be out there with the woodpeckers.  While I’m not losing time off of work (been disabled since 2004), this pain of various sorts does change what I am able to do here AT home.  Things like laundry, vacuuming, other cleaning, etc are put on hold quite often.  If I’m having one of the ‘bad’ days, there’s no way I’ll get in a car and go to the grocery store, pharmacy, or MD appointments (the only places I go).

All I know is that the past several weeks (that have come in waves for years) are getting really old. I’m going to have to stop being stubborn about the stronger meds if I want any quality of life between ‘waves’.  I’m already limited. I want to have as much ability to function as possible, and this level and duration of pain isn’t OK.  My pain doc has been very good about letting me let him know when I need something stronger, since I’ve been so hard-headed about using the stuff.  He knows when I say I’ve had ‘enough’ that  I’m not looking for drugs- I want to not hurt (as much).  I need to make the appointment, and go see him (he does NO prescribing/refills over the phone past the ones on any written prescription).  He does NO dosage or medication changes over the phone.  So, I have to drag my butt in there.  He’ll probably do some sort of injection (spine, jaw, neck, occipital nerve blocks, facet injections). The ones in my lower spine seem to help the most- I could tell that my legs hurt less when I’m at the store after I got the last shot.  I may ask for my left knee to get zapped.

Now to just find a day to go and see him when I feel well enough to see a doctor.  But even though it’s been pretty unpleasant lately, I realize that I have so much to be thankful for.  I know that God hasn’t deserted me, and that I can get a lot of comfort in knowing that whenever I get to eternity, I’ll get a new body without pain.  That helps. 🙂

Update:   After being on CPAP for more than a year, the daily headaches are pretty much gone !  They were caused by hypoxia from not breathing at night.  The rest of the stuff is still a bummer, and I’m off to see my regular MD today (10-19-2016) to get medical clearance for massages and a chiropractor.