Triggered ER Memories…

I got a canned e-mail from my dad’s medical provider, asking for one of those Press-Ganey surveys to be filled out.   I don’t do those.   They’re a colossal waste of time, and the results are used ‘against’ nurses in ways that are demeaning of the job. They’re a popularity contest for healthcare. Nurses aren’t concierge staff… they’re there primarily to give medical care.  Not have to be subjected to some very fortunate person complaining about not getting coffee ‘sooner’, totally oblivious to the reason it was ‘late’ was that the nurse was doing CPR on someone two doors down.   Anyway, it got me all stirred up, and I wrote the following before seeing that it was a ‘no-reply’ e-mail.  Sneaky them :p

–I’m xxxxx’s DPOAH, and deal with all of his e-mail (I’m his daughter- and a disabled RN). He is pleased with his care w/Dr. Kxxx- no issues whatsoever. I go to some appointments with dad, and also have Dr. Kxxx as an oncologist- great folks in the office area, lab draw folks, and Dr. Kxxx himself. Couldn’t get much better.

As an RN (I still keep my license), I have a general loathing for Press-Ganey, since it doesn’t consider all factors in someone’s care (especially inpatient- like if someone complains about their coffee request being slow to be delivered, while the nurse is tending to someone who is either trying to die, or has coded somewhere down the hall). Totally bogus complaint in the GRAND SCHEME of things… our society is too much about “me”, and not about the entire picture.

IF there are issues, I have no problem contacting the hospital directly. It’s really none of Press-Ganey’s business in my opinion. If you can tell me why their butting in is so important, I’m teachable !

I do have some compliments regarding a couple of tests I had a week or two ago. I had a abdominal and pelvic CT w/contrast and a CXR. The nurse and techs in both departments were outstanding. Lisa and Shannon were in the CT department- both very personable, friendly, and gave great instructions. They had the perfect balance between respecting my knowledge as an RN since 1985, as well as informing me of what was going on (and what needed to happen since I’m on metformin- and getting a follow-up creatinine done 2 days later). Lynette was in x-ray, and came SO quickly to get me for the CXR- very professional as well, and also kind. They made the inconvenience of having to drag my ratty body away from home much less unpleasant. My overall experiences in the outpatient/testing departments have always been good- every last person has been pleasant and professional. I didn’t feel like they were trying to suck up, so that Press-Ganey would be happy… they were genuinely doing a nice job.

I have had my share of nightmares in the ER there…

I haven’t been to that ER in a several years- so this might be outdated (wanna be fair). My experiences there in the early to mid-2000s were horrific. I was considered a ‘frequent flyer’, though many times, someone else called 911 because I’d lost consciousness (I have dysautonomia and documented epilepsy among other things). I could give you a laundry list of abuses and negligence in that place. Maybe it’s better now- I hope so. When I got there because I had actually been awake enough to call for help, I was following my MD’s instructions for when to get help (my blood pressure would drop into the 50s systolically- and it wasn’t safe to NOT get help when just lying down wouldn’t do anything). I still was verbally demeaned- for following my doctor’s instructions.  It’s so important for those in the ER to know that just because THEY aren’t familiar with a diagnosis doesn’t mean that it’s automatically some psych disorder, and they don’t know everything about the person, just because they have some vague medical info on them.  I never asked for pain meds, never had a squadron of unruly family around (never had ANYONE around), never even asked for help to the bathroom- which was partly because the call-light was nowhere to be seen, etc. I was told I was a “wasted bed”, and that “seizure patients never follow up”; (I actually had monthly appointments with my doctor at that time because things were so unstable). It got so bad that I learned to put in my own small gauge NG tube and put in 1/2 strength Gatorade by gravity, to increase my fluids- and take my chances at home. My doc  wasn’t thrilled with that (but I know how to manage an NG safely)- yet she knew what had gone on in the ER from what another doc had told her (he was one of the few nice docs). It’s amazing what medical equipment was available on eBay back then.

On April 1, 2007, I was brought in (BP dropped again), and by the time I got there, with the jostling around, it was better, but I still didn’t feel right… I had had a few weeks of weird symptoms that weren’t quite my ‘normal’ weird. The doc on that night actually refused to examine me. He wouldn’t repeat the BP (meant pushing a button- and he didn’t even have to do that; a nurse was near the monitor). I continued to have odd symptoms after being sent home, and eventually had substernal chest pain radiating into my neck. On April 11, I called my doc’s office and was told to go to a different hospital,  and tell them about the chest pain; THEY would take care of me. Tests showed that  I had multiple chronic, sub-acute, and acute PEs in all three lobes of my right lung and R PA (pulmonary artery). I spent 17 days in the hospital getting regulated on warfarin. The chest pain was from my lung pushing into the apex of my heart. That ER doc’s personal ASSUMPTIONS  at St. Xxxx’s could have cost me my life. As it turned out, it was ‘just’ another blow to my feelings as a sub-human. I didn’t have the typical PE symptoms until the 11th (actually the night before- but I wanted to talk to my doc about what to do since going to St. Xxxx’s ER was just a set-up to be blown off and humiliated).  And the doc didn’t bother to see WHY I’d been there “too much” (his words) in the prior couple of weeks.

Being considered a psych case, I was sent home unable to walk one time- crawled into the cab, then crawled to my front door. Another time, I was put in a wheelchair van, and sent home- if I needed a wheelchair to go home, how was I supposed to manage at home. Alone. ?  One doc began to intubate me without checking to see if I was even awake (I was- I’d just regained consciousness, and saw him walk in the room- alone, no help for suctioning, no meds for a genuine intubation, no indication of what he was going to do)…. he knicked a tonsil going in, cutting it, and setting off my gag reflex- so then I was vomiting blood. A nurse came in, and he eventually pulled the laryngoscope out. He asked me if I’d OD’d (a common assumption- though no drug tests were ever positive), and I said no. He told me that’s all I had to say… he never asked me anything!  I didn’t know what he was going to do (he was behind my head- my eyes back there don’t work well). Then left the room. I was so embarrassed to have vomited- but I guess they call it a gag reflex for a reason.  That nurse was very kind as she helped me get cleaned up… she must have been new.

A nurse put a Foley in one time (I’d lost consciousness at a neighbor’s home, and she’d called 911… I’d had no presyncopal feeling -which I generally did- just awake one minute, and about 3 hours later waking up in the ER). The nurse blew up the catheter balloon up ON my internal sphincter. I said it hurt, and was trying to tell her it hurt WAY more than it should- and she turned around and walked out of the room. She just left.  Absolutely no acknowledgment of what I was saying, yet she was looking at me; she heard me, and saw me trying to move the catheter.  I managed to push it in far enough to actually be in my bladder.  It took 4 liters of fluid to get my systolic BP to hit 80…. I was sent to ICU, and just managed to avoid dopamine (which could have been a disaster for someone with dysautonomia).  I was admitted as an OD– yet NO drug screens  EVER showed any type of drugs.  Really?  Even with evidence, I was still some loathed OD patient?  My doc came to see me the next morning, and told me she’d see if she could enter a note to negate the OD diagnosis.

These are a few things that I will probably never forget… and the ER at St. Xxxx’s still scares me. I sent a few letters to the customer service person (whatever they’re called) at the time, and got the canned letter of ‘we strive for excellence in patient care’, blah, blah, blah. Nothing ever changed, because I was seen as a nut job. NO psych history, no drug abuse, no ODs, nothing psych related at all. Just judgmental nurses and docs who saw me too often for their liking. I (me, myself- no doctor) eventually figured out a medication interaction that was contributing to some of the BP issues (the dysautonomia won’t ever go away- but it helps to not have interactions messing with it). I also started going to another ER if I had stuff going on that required an ER (after the PEs, there were some other incidents of chest discomfort/SOB, as well as hematuria one time, requiring some IM vitamin K, and an overnight stay for a couple of tests and IV antibiotics for a UTI). I’m lucky I went there when I was having symptoms that were eventually diagnosed as AML- subtype M3 (APL). I was there for 6 weeks in isolation, induction chemo, and started 19 months of daily chemo of some type (except for ‘scheduled breaks’ and when I had shingles on my butt). I don’t have confidence that St. Xxxx ER docs would have bothered to check things out. And, I could have ended up like Jeannie Hayes- the WREX anchor who died 2 days after officially being diagnosed, after a brain bleed.

As an RN, I know that some patients are annoying, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t some genuine medical issue going on as well. I did my best to not bother the ER staff. I did anything they asked of me while I was there. Most of the time, I didn’t make the call to be sent there, and when I did, it was because of my personal doc’s parameters. Nobody deserves to be treated like they’re a crazy HUMAN being, and waste of time. I think some of it is the age of many of the newer nurses, and the overall mentality that ‘work’ is a destination, not a verb. I don’t remember a single nasty tech, lab person, etc… it was always the docs and nurses…. very sad.  And even if I HAD been someone with some psychiatric issues, does that mean that subhuman care is justified?   People ask why those who do have mental health issues don’t get help… I can guess part of the reason.  The humiliation isn’t worth it. 

Anyway, I’m sure this is more than you wanted to hear. I don’t do Press-Ganey, since they don’t address issues I’ve had. They run a popularity contest, and I’m not interested in those.

Have an enjoyable week, and maybe remind the ER staff that they know nothing of the patients’ entire lives… they see a snapshot of a bad time. And regardless, they still don’t deserve to be belittled, or even physically injured because of their prejudice and assumptions.—-  (end of ‘note’)

ER staff gets very little information about a patient’s entire life- or even enough to make a true assessment (or judgement) about the person.  They see symptoms and test results, and whether or not they like the ‘diagnosis’ of patient who is before them.  It’s unprofessional and abusive to not treat someone with compassion.  If it was their family member being talked to in the same manner, they’d be outraged- yet they feel it’s OK to do it to strangers.   I realize that there are some amazing, compassionate emergency rooms out there, with incredibly kind and patient staff nurses and doctors.  I commend them.  They have to deal with whatever walks in the door- and that has to be difficult.

IF it becomes so easy to judge an entire person on a diagnosis (and be less than humane), it’s time to find a new job, or another area of medicine to work in… maybe the morgue.   😉

The End of Life As I Knew It

Nine years ago, on April 6, 2004, life as I knew it stopped.  It was my last day working as a full time registered nurse because of medical disability. I tried to go back to work a few months later, but it was a total failure, even though I was working back into full time hours slowly. My body was broken.  There was nothing to do to fix it.  I entered a world I didn’t really  understand- that of being useless and having no obvious purpose. My life since the age of 21 had been about being an RN (I graduated from nursing school in May 1985).  I had worked so many overtime hours and holidays because I enjoyed working.  And then it was gone.

I’m not sure when the medical problems ‘officially’ started, but I know when they got bad.  About 5 months after moving back to the midwest from Texas, and being subjected to indoor heat, the symptoms of my dysautonomia became severe enough to cause me to start having heart rate and blood pressure episodes that made working impossible at times. Then, over the next 10-11 months, it got to the point  of being totally unable to work.  I’d pass out if I got overheated, and that didn’t have to be all that warm- most people found themselves comfortable when I was turning beet red and feeling like I was going to faint.  Then there were the seizures.  Later, it was discovered that they are more likely to start at the beginning of sleep cycles…but that could be at the beginning of blood sugar fatigue, as well as the deep sleep I’d end up in after one of the dysautonomia episodes. It was a mess to sort out.  My boss and co-workers told me what they’d seen, which helped the doctors at the time.

My employer had started sending me to the emergency room by ambulance when I was found unconscious or seen seizing or collapsing. I was a liability.  It got to be a routine occurrence.  I was sent out more than the elderly residents at the nursing home where I worked (like a dozen times in the last 2 months I was there).  I remember none of the ambulance trips, but I do remember a lot of abusive ER nurses and docs when I would ‘come to’, who thought I was a low-life ‘frequent flyer’. They never stopped to realize that I hadn’t sent myself to the ER- I’d been sent.  ER personnel like to fix things. I couldn’t be fixed, so they took it out on me with name calling and general ‘disgust’ when they interacted with me. There was a rare ‘nice’ doctor or nurse, but I began to dread waking up in the ER.  It got worse before it got better (I found a different ER).

Those initial months and then years of not working were really difficult. In addition to the neurological disorders, I was having drug interactions that dropped my blood pressure low enough to cause small strokes.  It wasn’t uncommon to have a blood pressure in the 40-50/20-30 range.  I was usually still conscious but definitely feeling very unwell.  It was scary.  I eventually figured out a way to put a thin feeding tube in my own nose to put Gatorade through, in order to increase my blood pressure with fluid volume.  It beat going to the ER.  There were also the times when the dysautonomia kicked in and my pulse and blood pressure would go nuts on their own.  I was so frustrated that I couldn’t just ‘make myself’ do things that used to be so normal.  Like work.  Or go out in public, where the thermostats were out of my control. Now, I’m pretty much homebound, aside from monthly trips to the grocery store or MD appointments. I have as much as possible delivered.  It’s just too painful and risky to do much away from home.

It took many years to work through the shock of being unable to work.  I kept thinking I just had to ‘make’ myself well enough.  But I was having trouble doing basic things around home.  My world shrunk to that of my apartment and the monthly trip to the grocery store, or doctors’ appointments.  At the time, I had nobody to socialize with; I had no friends here.  I also didn’t have online access to most people I’d known in Texas, and none with people here.  I had my dog- and she was so important. I also had regular contact with my dad. But nothing with anybody who understood being a nurse, or being disabled.

Things are getting progressively worse when it comes to ‘normal’ activities. I just took the trash to the dumpster (about 12-15 yards away), and am now in considerable pain.  Pain is a trigger for the dysautonomia (along with heat), so I need to get more comfortable to prevent my blood pressure from crashing.  It’s very frustrating to feel like such a ‘wimp’  with normal activities.  Making lunch is also painful.  I have ‘grab and go’ foods as much as possible.   When I have ‘good’ days, I’ll make tuna salad- and then hurt.  I keep trying to do things, and it’s harder and harder.  I don’t know what sort of future I’ll have.  I am trying to find ways just to  make things work here, so I don’t end up needing assisted living anytime soon.  I want to be independent. It’s hard to accept help.  I don’t want to be a ‘whiner’ or not do as much as I can… but when I do, I always end up in a lot of pain, and often pre-syncopal.  I turned the air conditioner on about a week ago, when the night temps were in the 20s, but daytime temps were over 40.  It’s a matter of just being able to survive being at home.

I think about my old life a lot.  I miss working as a nurse. I keep my license active so I don’t have to say I ‘was’ a nurse.  I still am a nurse- unable to work as one, but I’m still a ‘real’ nurse.  Many things have changed in the nine years I’ve been disabled. But there are core nursing things that I still remember. I remember some of the patients  I took care of, and many of the other nurses and personnel I worked with. Those are good memories.  I’m glad I have them.

To those who think it can never happen to them…. you never know what life is going to hand you, or what challenges may come  your way.  Get disability insurance whenever you can.  It can make the difference between living in a decent place, or barely making it at all.  Take time to enjoy things, and don’t work ALL the time.  Jump on all opportunities to experience all you can.  Don’t create regrets.  Do make time to nurture friendships that will last.  Don’t let horrible experiences create limitations that don’t have to be there.  Live as much as you can !

Blood Sugar Dump And Falling Into Walls

I didn’t feel that great yesterday.  Nothing specific, just a headache (which isn’t unusual for me at all), some queasiness, and just not feeling right.  So, I limited what I ate to jello, mashed potatoes, and other bland foods that provided some carbs to deal with the basal insulin dose I take twice a day.  The bland food helped the queasiness, and I figured I’d had enough carbs for the insulin.  I’m usually pretty good with my diabetic and  RN knowledge (nearly 28 years since graduating from nursing school; 20 years as a working RN taking care of a lot of diabetics, 17 years as a diabetic, and 8+ years of being disabled and learning a LOT from a patient’s point of view). I figured wrong.

I went to bed around 6:30 p.m.  Normally, I’m up until 2:00-3:00 a.m., easy.  I’m a night owl. And don’t talk to me before noon.  But, I was really tired, so I decided I’d either go to bed, sleep for a few hours, and then resume my normal night owl schedule, or I’d sleep straight through. I didn’t care.  I was still awake at 7:00 p.m., so decided I’d just take my nighttime meds (including my main dose of Lantus insulin) and be done with it for the night.  I crawled back into bed and fell asleep.

At 9:40 p.m. (it’s written down in my blood sugar log) I woke up to go to the bathroom, but felt really odd.  After falling into the walls walking to and from the bathroom, it dawned on my that I needed to check my blood sugar. It was 37mg/dl; I double checked it and it came back at 40mg/dl. It shouldn’t go below 70mg/dl, and my endocrinologist doesn’t want mine below 80mg/dl because of my history of epilepsy; I’m prone to seizures anyway- no point in adding hypoglycemia to the risks.  I was still with the program enough to grab one of my tubes of ‘gel’ candy (‘Squeeze Pops’ – cheaper than products marketed to diabetics, and tastes like Jolly Rancher candy, but in a tube, and a gel consistency). With some of that on board, I got some ginger ale. I checked my blood sugar about every 10 minutes until it had settled in the 90s (took about 30 minutes).  That was ‘safe’ enough to go to bed. I knew I needed a fat and protein source to keep from having rebound hypoglycemia, so justified a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup 🙂  I was still really tired, but at least didn’t feel like I was having for force myself to stay conscious. That was better.

It’s really important to not ‘just’ do the simple carbs, or the hypoglycemia WILL come back.  I’ve been treated in a local ER, and they are clueless about the protein/fat source after getting the blood sugar back up. One time when I’d been brought in by ambulance for hypoglycemia, I was sent to the waiting room to wait for a cab, and was told the cab would be there in 45 minutes. The basic instructions for hypoglycemia are to  have a snack if the next meal is more than 30 minutes after treating the low blood sugar episode.  That’s ‘diabetes 101’ for lay people, yet the genius ER nurse was either clueless or just didn’t care (typical of that facility’s ER). When I was waiting for the cab, my blood sugar went down to the 50s again, and I told the triage desk person. She told me that since I’d already been seen, one of the nurses would talk to me IF she got time. I was safer in the cab going home.  It was really pathetic, and there’s no excuse for them.

My endocrinologist had prescribed a glucagon kit to me somewhat recently- but I live alone. Glucagon is designed for someone who has already lost consciousness, and requires someone else to mix the syringe of sterile solution with the little vial of powder, mix it up, pull it back into the syringe, and ‘shoot’ the person who is out of it.  I’m not sure how that is supposed to help me, except that I’ve dropped to the 30s before and couldn’t get it to come back up, while remaining alert. (I ended up calling 911 for that one, and getting IV D50W- that stuff feels awful going in)  I guess I could shoot myself.  Glucagon can be given under the skin (subcutaneously) or into a muscle (intramuscularly), so basically any good dart throw at the person will work.  I could do that. My outer mid-thigh would probably be the best place to aim for… a fair amount of real estate for a blurry eye and shaky hand.  But the kit I’ve got right now is expired by a month. It would probably still work, but last night, the edible carbs were working. I need to call the pharmacy for a refill on the glucagon….

For those ER nurses (and others; I’ve given it a few times working on a med-surg floor) who have given D50W, here’s a little inside information. The stuff doesn’t feel good.  It causes a strange warm feeling, and a feeling of needing to go to the bathroom NOW.  It’s unpleasant. It can also cause dehydration, depending on how high the blood sugar goes, with frequent urination and hyperosmolar  diuresis (frequent peeing from concentrated sugar in the blood).  Knowing this, and offering to help someone to the bathroom would be nice.  Go a little slow pushing the stuff- a few extra seconds isn’t going to cause brain damage.

It’s also important to realize that the half-life of D50W is dependent on the degree of hypoglycemia and the individual patient. Once it wears off, the blood sugar drops again UNLESS there is something to help prolong its effects, such as fat and protein.  Peanut butter and crackers, a candy bar, milk and crackers, or other protein/fat source is needed.  That’s also the reason that those items are not good for treating the severe low blood sugar. For ‘borderline’ or mild hypoglycemia (above 60mg/dl those will probably work OK… but always listen to facility policy if you’re treating a patient; if something goes south, that will be the criteria used to judge you).   The blood sugar will not rise quickly with protein and/or fat in the item being used to treat it.  Candy bars are NOT good ‘first aid’ for hypoglycemia, and will delay return to normal blood sugar because of the fat and protein. Once the blood sugar is raised with simple carbs, it’s necessary to give a fat/protein source- not before.

Anyhoo… I survived the night.  I hate the feeling of having low blood sugar, and last night included balance problems. Had the walls not been there, I would have hit the floor, which would have been bad news for my knees.  I’m not feeling that great today (same queasy, fatigue stuff as yesterday), but know to check my blood sugar more often today.

Answering “Search Engine” Questions…

When I look at my site stats, I see the search engine topics that people are using to find information…. I’m using this post to answer some of those questions, in hopes of helping folks a bit ❤  I will edit at times to add more information as I see new topics.

Today, I saw a search for leg pain and leukemia M-3….  I do remember leg pain, with the chemo.  Several of the medications used had musculoskeletal pain as a side effect. ATRA and I think arsenic can cause pain.  I had more pain as the year of maintenance went on- I was on ATRA, methotrexate, and M6 mercaptopurine at the time.

I also saw a search for diabetes and chemo- my blood sugars went nuts when I was on chemo. They’re just now getting back to some sort of normal range.  It took several months and a trip to a Joslin affiliated endocrinologist for some insulin and metformin adjustments.

I just saw a search for ‘what could have gone wrong in the ER when someone dies from leukemia there’…. well, some leukemias are known for being really bad for causing ‘bleeds’ – sometimes in the brain (can be fatal very quickly), and sometimes in other parts of the body that can be really significant before they’re detected.  Also, leukemia is known for not protecting the body from infection- so someone could have a really bad infection and not be able to fight it- but if they didn’t know they had leukemia, they might not get help until the body couldn’t keep going (septic shock).  Leukemia can show up in ERs for the first time. Sometimes, the only time it shows up is during an autopsy.  😦

As far as people dying from APL in this day and age, yes. It happens. I know of 2 people in the last 6 weeks who died within 2 days of being diagnosed.  Because the blood clotting cells (platelets) are very low with APL when it is diagnosed, there is a huge risk for severe, and possibly fatal hemorrhages in the body or brain.  Those can be lethal very quickly.  APL also causes impaired ability for the body to fight infections. That can also cause death.  I was lucky to be diagnosed in time; some people are diagnosed at their autopsies.  But I was also very sick.  I got infections, and also tiny purple spots all over my legs and abdomen from low platelets. I got 13 platelet transfusions and 12 blood transfusions.   If APL isn’t treated it IS fatal. End of story.  If it is treated, but the disease is too advanced, or infections are too severe, death is a very real possibility. As an RN, I understood what was happening to me, but I was too worn out to really pay much attention…but I was SICK !!

If someone goes to the emergency room with advanced APL, it is VERY possible that the ER didn’t do anything wrong.  The disease was simply too advanced.  If someone goes to the ER because of severe headaches or decreasing level of consciousness (or coma), the brain bleed has already happened.  The ER is NOT the place for APL to be treated. They can identify lab work that indicates the probability of some type of leukemia, but it takes a bone marrow biopsy and specialized testing in specific labs (often not in the actual hospital since it is SO specific) to determine the type of leukemia. But the most an ER can do is identify the probable problem, and send the patient to the proper part of the hospital for complete diagnosis, and specific treatment.

Another search engine term I’ve seen more than once on my site stats involves defining what a ‘frequent flyer’ is in regards to an emergency room.  ERs consider someone to be a frequent flyer if they are in the ER a lot, and often if they are either looking for pain medications OR don’t have a primary doctor of their own. Frequent flyers are not regarded well by ER staff.  Most of the time (not always) the frequent flyers go to the ER for things that aren’t actual emergencies.  Many also visit several local ERs to either get meds or see a physician for something that is really not appropriate to have cared for in an ER.  They waste resources in many cases. They cost a lot of money (many also don’t have insurance).  SOMETIMES, the ER really doesn’t have a clue why someone is in their ER- they make judgements about the person that aren’t true.  But in most cases, frequent flyers are there because they made the decision to go to the ER and seek some sort of ‘care’.

For : ‘If I’ve had leukemia for over 3 years is it too late to fix this?”- it really depends on the type of leukemia- if you’ve had it for that long and hadn’t been diagnosed or treated, it sounds like a slower chronic form (if you have leukemia at all– there are other things that can have similar symptoms)- whether it’s myelocytic or lymphocytic requires specific testing.  It’s not over until it’s over !  See your doctor, and get it checked out 🙂

Whoever is entering ‘two nurses having sex’, ‘nurses sex’, ‘nurse sex’, or other inappropriate terms into the search engines- GET HELP.   It’s repulsive to have some pervert finding my posts.  If you wonder how two nurses have sex, they don’t have any special parts.  If you want some twisted porn site, then go to ‘porn’, and look there. GO AWAY.   Geez- you’re at it every. damn. day.   Get a magazine and go deal with yourself.

How to pronounce the Swedish cheese bondost spelled Bond Ost…. in English, it comes out like this :  Bónd Oost.  The ‘bond’ is more like booned. But not as long with the o’s.  If that makes sense- LOL.  😉

As far as recipes for Swedish sylta- there are some great Swedish recipes if you just enter exactly what you did…. how to make Swedish sylta.  I personally don’t like veal jello 🙂

For the person asking about the schnauzer waking up gasping and breathing heavily- and why dogs hold their heads up to breathe when they have heart failure :  The dogs’ hearts aren’t pumping oxygenated blood effectively, so they gasp to get more air… they hold their heads up because sometimes the heart becomes so enlarged (I saw my dog’s chest x-ray- it’s dramatic) it actually shifts the windpipe, and it’s ‘bent’.   Medications and prescription diets can help- one of my dogs made it 12 GOOD months. My dog who died 10 days ago made it about 9 months or so.

“Roof of my mouth is smoothed out”….. that happened to me when I got the induction chemo for APL (leukemia).  It went back to normal within a month or so after the last day of the induction chemo, and the consolidation and maintenance did not have that effect on my mouth.

A really important search engine term today:  ‘In ‘mission’ (remission) from APL leukemia for a year so won’t relapse’…. YES- you CAN relapse- that is why follow-up care is so important !  You didn’t go through all of that chemo for nothing !!  Keep following up with your oncologist !  You can relapse at any time, though my understanding is that after 5 years of CONTINUOUS remission, you are considered ‘permanent remission’ or cured.

To the bulimic who ‘pucked up blood clots’…. GO TO THE EMERGENCY ROOM.  Your esophagus could be tearing, which is fatal if not treated.  No joke. Get yourself seen by a doctor.  Suck it up, and get some help ❤  It’s scary, but you seriously could be getting ready to blow your esophagus (or stomach) and bleed to death.

OK…. here’s a favorite one (and it’s from today !!)  ‘witch side of the syringe is the cc side’ (sic)…  Here’s a tip. If you don’t know, put the syringe DOWN !!  If you’re in some sort of training to learn to use them, they will tell you.  If you have a legitimate reason for handling syringes, there is someone to ask- and it’s a valid question. But to ask that in a search engine search bar tells me something isn’t quite right, possibly !  🙂

To the person who entered “can you get disability for not being able to wipe your butt?” in the search engine, how about this- with that level of dumb ass you might just qualify.  Disability isn’t a joke. You, however, are.  Do you have any idea what being disabled actually means?  Do you have any human DNA? Or are you just so mentally disturbed that you don’t care?   If the lack of ability for personal hygiene is part of an actual disorder, then maybe…. just maybe you (or whoever) would qualify. Go ask someone who might know your situation, and quit looking up offensive topics.  OR play in traffic – the results of that may land you on disability.

Edit:  I guess I was annoyed that day 😮   Disability still isn’t a joke, and is a demeaning place to end up.  It’s not a career destination.  😦    I miss working every single day.  I miss feeling useful.  I miss having a sense of purpose.  I miss taking care of patients.  And, I even miss the idiots 😉

Emergency Room From Hell

There is a local emergency room that actually scares me.  I’m not the only one- whenever I mention its name to someone (even my new oncologist who works for the same organization) the reaction is usually “Oh, I know what you mean. I/my brother/mom/ dad/friend/ etc went there and they almost killed me/them.”  Their posted patient satisfaction percentages have been in the %60 range. That is BAD.  Hospitals run on patient satisfaction surveys (which is a whole other nightmare for healthcare professionals).  Reputations are hard to fix.  What is so bizarre is that the rest of the hospital is fine, or at least survivable. I’ve had many outpatient tests, a couple of admissions from the ER, and also a knee replacement at the same place, and the staff was tolerable.  I did have some complications after the knee replacement that were figured out a bit late, but nothing as bad as their ER.

One time when I was admitted, I had a nurse tell me that I needed to go home.  At the time, I was on a heart monitor because my heart rate had dropped into the 30s and was being erratic. But she looked familiar- I think she was one of the hags from the ER who was working on the cardiac floor.  I never could figure out how nurses could be so nasty.  I’ve had some unlikable patients, and some that were really unpleasant to deal with- but I’d never be inhumane or callously disregard their dignity.

I’ve got multiple chronic illnesses, and I’ve been an RN since 1985.  I’m on disability, but I keep my license current, and I know the appropriate manner in which to speak to and deal with patients. I’ve been a staff nurse, supervisor, charge nurse, and department head.  I’ve also been sent to various ERs over the years, though this scary one has been the worst, hands down.  Not even a close second comes to mind.   I was often sent there from work, unconscious, either from being post-ictal (what happens after seizures when people sleep very deeply) or my blood pressure bottomed out from my autonomic nervous system not working right (dysautonomia), and I’d pass out.

Other times, someone called 911 when they were either with me, or on the phone with me, and they could tell something wasn’t right (turned out I had some medication interactions that weren’t figured out for quite a while that contributed to some of the blood pressure problems).  I was labelled a ‘frequent flyer’, which is an extremely derogatory term given to patients who generally don’t have primary doctors and are often non-compliant. Neither of those applied to me. I saw my regular doctor monthly, and all blood levels of anticonvulsants were always therapeutic. I’m on disability because my seizures are not controlled. I’ve had testing done to see if part of my brain could be removed to stop the seizures, and that turned out not to be possible without causing more damage than it could help.  I’m not some joke patient who shows up for the heck of it (I’ve been accused of being bored, and using the ER for entertainment at the bad one).

But, the nurses and doctors at this ER didn’t care about me as a human at all. They never asked about regular doctor visits.  I was told I was a ‘wasted bed’ because I’d been brought in with seizures.  I was told that it was highly unlikely that I was compliant with anything.  They didn’t understand- or even try to find out- what I was really like as a patient- when I said anything that contradicted their assumptions, it was ignored. They made their assumptions and treated me as the parasite they thought I was.  The dysautonomia isn’t all that common as a given diagnosis.  It causes extremes in blood pressure and heart rates (and for me, heat and pain are major triggers).  My blood pressure would drop to a dangerous level at home  and per my primary doctor’s instructions, I would call 911 when it got below 70/50.  It was often much lower, and the lowest I know it to have gone is 44/16 during a tilt table test.  Even with objective symptoms, I was treated like a head case.

I rarely remember getting to the ER.  I had learned that when I woke up and saw the drop ceilings and bright lights and equipment, I was in the ER.  One night I woke up and a doctor was counting my pills from medication bottles EMS had brought from my apartment when a neighbor called them after I passed out in her apartment.  I asked him what he was doing, and he asked if I’d overdosed. I said definitely not- and asked what happened. It had taken 4 bags of IV fluids to get my blood pressure up to 80 systolic, and the nurses were getting me ready to go to ICU for dopamine (a resuscitative drug to maintain blood pressure). I ended up not needing it, since I managed to stay around 80 systolic, and I was making sense once I regained consciousness. But in the preparation to send me to ICU, a urinary catheter was inserted.  The balloon that keeps it inside was inflated before it got all the way into my bladder, and stretched my internal sphincter (what keeps the urine in the bladder) and upper urethra…talk about pain. I told the nurse it wasn’t all the way in, and she turned to leave the room without saying a word. I pushed it in the rest of the way myself.

Another time, I had just ‘come to’ and saw a doctor walking past the stretcher. I was still groggy, and he didn’t say anything to me, so I didn’t talk to him. I didn’t know what he wanted (or for sure that he was even a doctor for that matter- some guy in a white coat). He proceeded to begin to insert a breathing tube into my airway- something that isn’t done without someone to suction in case the patient vomits, some paralytic drugs to dull the gag reflex (to prevent vomiting) and calm the patient IF they need to be intubated, and without asking the patient if they are awake and know what is going on.  I have no idea why he wanted to intubate me (which more than likely would have landed me on a ventilator). He started putting the metal blade of the laryngoscope down my throat (has a light on it to see where to put the tube), and then the tube, which did trigger my gag reflex and I started to throw up. I turned my head to the right to let the puke fall out, and the metal blade (still down my throat) nicked my right tonsil, and it started bleeding. A nurse came in (finally) and since I was trying to breathe and reflexively trying to get the stuff out of my mouth and airway, they tied me down.  The doctor finally took the stuff out of my mouth and asked if I’d OD’d… I said “No!”.  He said “That’s all you had to say.” I couldn’t believe it… that was all HE had to ask !  I didn’t even know why I was there (still don’t), and it was HIS job to assess me before attempting to put in an endotracheal tube. It could be that because he assumed I’d OD’d that they were going to pump my stomach, and the ET tube was part of keeping my airway safe. But, nobody said anything to me. My medical record would have shown other ER visits with similar symptoms and ‘clean’ drug screens… There was one nurse who was helping me get cleaned up after the throwing up who was kind. She had a daughter with seizures and understood the post-ictal period.  I was just mortified.

I never got on the call light (when I could reach it), and would undo the monitors myself if I had to go to the bathroom, and put myself back on the monitors when I got back. I never asked for pain meds. I didn’t ask for anything.  I was never there for psychiatric reasons (patients who are not thought of well in most medical facilities, mostly from lack of knowledge and exposure to the various disorders). And yet I was treated like I was a total pain in the butt and whack job.

When someone comes out of seizures, there is generally a period of time when they are either extremely sleepy (and even coma-like) or mildly confused for a little while. Not everyone ‘comes to’ the same way. Not everyone has ‘TV seizures’.  I have complex partial seizures that turn into generalized seizures at times (when I end up ‘out cold’ the worst).  When I come to, I can hear things first, and then gradually get back up to speed- but sometimes my response time is slow.  The nurses at this ER from hell didn’t like that, so they’d double team me and put TWO  ammonia inhalants under my nose and hold them there as I gasped for air.  I was awake and knew what they were doing- but I wasn’t ‘all the way back’, so my response time was too slow for them- so they assumed I was a psych case being difficult. Or faking.  They were punitive.

When Social Security was reviewing my disability paperwork, they had over 1000 pages of medical documentation over the previous 3 years, including abnormal EEGs (brain wave tests used to help diagnose seizures/epilepsy) and blood pressure crashes.  But the nurses at that ER thought I was a nut job.  I was horrified that SO many nurses like that exist.  When I’d worked in Texas for 17 years before returning to Illinois, I worked with great nurses. Even if someone wasn’t necessarily going to be a ‘friend’ outside of work, I never saw cruelty or pure meanness.  We had a lot of wild shifts at work- and I never saw one of my coworkers in Texas act like those hostile nurses in that one ER.  I’d worked in another hospital in this town (pediatrics) and then a nursing home- and those nurses were also good to their patients.  But the nurses in that ER of the religiously-affiliated hospital were downright nasty. The docs weren’t much better.

When I was taken in for very low blood sugar one time, they got my blood sugar up with two ‘amps’ of D50 (sugar solution given IV), and then called a cab.  The nurse told me that it would be about 45 minutes until the cab got there, and I should wait in the waiting room. Basic treatment of hypoglycemia instructs people to eat a snack with protein and fat to prevent blood pressure from crashing again once the D50 ‘wears off’, unless their next meal is within the next 30 minutes.  I was sent to the waiting room with nothing (usually a half a sandwich, or peanut butter and crackers is standard hospital fare for low blood sugar after it’s brought back up).  Fortunately, I had my purse with some change for vending machines, and my own blood sugar monitor.  Within a few minutes, I could feel my blood sugar dropping even though I’d gotten a bag of peanuts from the machine.  I tried Coke, and it was still dropping. When I told the person at the triage window, she told me I’d already been treated, and if a nurse had time she’d come and talk to me.  I was safer on my own.

There had been a weird period of time when I was having episodes that were much like the autonomic disorder, and a bit like seizures, but not quite. I had been in the ER (per home health instructions) several times in one month. One night, I was having more trouble with my blood pressure, and went to the ER. The doctor actually told me I’d been there too much that month, and he wasn’t going to do anything. I asked if they could at least check my blood pressure again (it had come up somewhat from being moved from the ambulance stretcher to the ER gurney), and he refused to tell the nurse to simply push the button to do another BP reading.  He never got within 5 feet of me.  Ten days later, I had severe chest pain, and ended up going to another ER (per the instructions of my doctor’s nurse, who was affiliated with the scary place), and it was discovered that I had multiple blood clots in my right lung (all three lobes) and right pulmonary artery that were pushing into the base of my heart, causing EKG changes that showed my heart wasn’t getting enough oxygen (just from the pressure of the junk in my lung).  The clots were of various ages- acute, subacute, and chronic- so would have been present during the time when the doctor negligently blew me off. He could have killed me with that decision.

I’ve written to the hospital with the creepy ER, and got the standard ‘we aim to give the best possible care’ letters. My own doctor was told by one of the few nice doctors at the bad ER that he’d witnessed how I’d been treated. It wasn’t just me being snarky.  My doctor believed me. The ‘new’ ER saved my life.  I had asked the doc at the ‘good place’ that night the pulmonary emboli were found if I could go home and get a few things since I was being admitted for a few days, and she told me she didn’t think I’d live that long; the next night I was in ICU getting clot-busting drugs when I started having the same pain again.  I’d driven myself to the ER… not recommended.

For those in nursing school, new grads, or starting to work with different types of patients,   consider this:  You aren’t going to understand everything about everybody you encounter as a nurse. But just because YOU don’t get it doesn’t mean it’s OK to take out your lack of knowledge on the patient,  who could very well teach you something.  Cruelty during urgent/unstable medical situations  is never justified.  And it’s not something that can be ‘fixed’ later. You represent where you work, and your profession.  It’s not about you when you’re assigned to take care of someone.

Mom’s Final Days…Please Excuse Me While I Bawl My Eyes Out

This is still rough.  And yes, it’s long.

Mom had been through so much, and survived.  She had been through breast cancer, pre-cancerous tumors in the other breast (so bilateral mastectomies when all was said and done), reconstruction, metastasis to her right lung (so part of her lung removed), and then metastasis to her brain (so removal of a right frontal brain tumor, roughly the size of a golf ball). In the mix, she’d also had a hysterectomy, gallbladder removal,  and ankle surgery (she fell and broke it in the bathroom).   There were countless hospitalizations, radiation, chemotherapy, rehab, and progressive decline.

By March 2003, mom had been cancer free for 17 years.  Considering the number of sites  where she’d had it , that’s pretty amazing.  But the radiation for the brain cancer had left her with dementia.  Bottom line- she was goofy. Her memory was horrible.  She could still answer simple questions, and liked going out on rides in the car. She still had some things she enjoyed (if it came in the form of a candy bar, so much the better).  The day before she ended up in the emergency room in Sun City West, AZ, she had been to an art opening and visited with friends.  She may have had no memory of it later that day, but for the moment, she was happy.

Dad called me one afternoon to tell me something was wrong. She just wasn’t  right. Something had ‘dulled’.  I told him she may have had a seizure and to keep an eye on her. If he saw a seizure, dial 911.  I got a call not long after that from him; they were in the ER at Sun City West Hospital.  She’d had a seizure, vomited, and then been out cold when 911 got there.  He sounded scared, and he never sounded scared with all she’d been through before this.  I told him to call me with any updates.  I was near Chicago, so really depending on his reports.  I felt helpless.  I’m an RN.  I want to help ‘fix’ things when family and friends are sick.

He called me  a while later saying that they couldn’t get blood from her to do tests. Huh? This made no sense; they’d gotten an IV in her and had fluids going. Her urine test showed an infection. With the change in her normal behavior and the positive urine test, that told me she was septic. That is basic, BASIC knowledge in the medical field, especially with older patients.  I told him to tell them that they needed to restrain her, and get the blood. They refused to use restraints even briefly- so did an incomplete workup for their convenience.   We exchanged a few more phone calls (me getting more and more angry), and the bottom line was they were sending her HOME with him on oral antibiotics (well, their rental home).  A partially conscious woman with a urinary tract infection bad enough to make her lose consciousness and seize, and she was being sent home.  I was beyond livid.  Dad was terrified.  It took three people to get her into the car (a clue?), and he had to get help from friends on the other end to get her to bed.  Somewhere along the line, they got the antibiotic pills.

I’ll never believe that the ER people did what they needed to do because mom had dementia and was a ‘no-code’ (but she wasn’t actively dying yet; the no-code was not in effect).  And the hospital was full (like they couldn’t move her to another hospital; she NEEDED IV antibiotics and fluids).  The doctor signed off that she was safe to fly later on… that’s nuts, but she’d be out of his hair.  I’ll never know if it would have made a difference.  I just wanted her to have a chance. As it ended up, dad and I have to look at the one positive: she didn’t end up curled up in a nursing home, not knowing anybody or anything.

Over the next few days, dad came up with various ideas on how to get her home. She was taking the crushed pills in applesauce, and when I’d talked to her, she sounded exhausted but was answering the usual basic questions. She was doing better- but not great.  I didn’t know exactly how badly her body was doing, but I knew I supported dad’s plan to get her home.  Except the plan to drive her home.  I had visions of her dying en route, him being arrested for transporting a body, and mom left in the car in some car impound area…. sometimes an imagination is a bad thing.  I made him  promise me NO DRIVING HOME. He promised.  The final option was for her to fly to O’Hare where a friend of dad’s would drive me in with his van so we could let mom lie down in the back while he drove us back home. Dad would then drive on his own, and be back in about three days.  When I talked to her, I was satisfied that she was ‘back’ enough to be near her baseline.

Well, part of that worked out.  Dad got to Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix, and the folks at American Airlines said she could fly, but only if he was with her.  He left everything but what he was wearing and got on the plane with her.  A few hours later, they were in Chicago.  I was allowed past the security gates to help get her off of the plane. The folks at American Airlines were wonderful. Her wheelchair was waiting (as were a few others- must have been handicapped day for flying), and the flight attendants said “Oh, you must be J”…. Uh, yeah?  Mom  smiled when she saw me, and we got her into her chair, and headed for the van.

When we got to the van, it’s like mom knew she was near home, and partially collapsed. She didn’t have to fight. I was getting nervous that we wouldn’t make it back home to the hospital where her doctor practiced. (why do they call it ‘practice’?  Shouldn’t they ‘know’ at that point?) I’d brought a blanket to use as a sling to ‘arrange her’ in the back of the van- which dad’s friend helped me do while dad put the wheelchair in the way back part of the van.  Dad was muttering about getting her home to bed, and after a good night’s sleep, she’d be fine.  I looked at dad’s friend, and shook my head no.  We weren’t going home. We were going to the ER.  If I had to get out at some toll booth area, and do some psycho dance, we were NOT going home.

Mom moaned most of the way back to our home town. Somewhere along the way, dad knew that we needed to go to the ER (thank God).  We got her there, moved to a stretcher from the parking lot, and thus began the end.  The ER people knew by looking at her that she was going to be admitted, and when they started an IV, they got blood.  Hear that, Sun City West ‘Hospital’???  It was BAD.  She was septic (duh) and her kidneys were failing. She also had a high blood sugar (she wasn’t diabetic and not on steroids).  She did know the name of her doctor when he came in to see her.  Dad and I stepped out into the hall with him and one of his first questions was about resuscitation measures that we wanted.   We’d discussed this before. If it got to this point, comfort was the primary issue.  It was fine to do fluids and antibiotics in this situation since she was in and out of lucidity, and she theoretically could get better…but her kidneys had never looked this cruddy. She was dying. The blood sugar issue wasn’t helping anything. Her white blood count wasn’t good.  We decided to get her admitted, see her through that and then go home to bed since she was relatively stable.

I’ve seen so many people die I’ve lost count.  That sounds rather cold, but as an RN of 18 years at that point, it just wasn’t possible to remember them all.  I knew the signs. I was seeing some of them, but I was still in and out of denial.  I felt OK going home that night though.  Dad and I told the nurses to call us if anything changed; we lived about 5 minutes away. We went home. She was awake, and tired, but looked ‘settled’.

The next morning, mom was getting the last part of her bath when we first got there, so we waited in the hall for a few minutes.  When we went in, she was awake, and recognized us. She was even drinking some nutritional juice-type drink (not the milky based stuff). She’d had a seizure during the night, and got some IV medication for that, but was doing a bit better. The nurses were wonderful about letting me see her lab work, and her white count was down, mostly from being diluted somewhat from the IV fluids. It was still in the septic range, and her kidney function was still in the ‘not-going-to-get-better’ range.  But she looked a bit perkier.  That was nice for the moment.

At lunch, dad’s friend (who did the van driving the day before) had offered to fly to Phoenix, and get the stuff from the rental house. He then offered to drive the car back to the Chicago area.  Wow.  We all went to the hospital cafeteria to talk about the plans.

We got back to mom’s room about an hour after we’d gone to the cafeteria, and there had been a huge change.  She was beginning to mottle, and was groggy. I’d seen that  mottling SO many times, and that is one of the things that people don’t come back from.  It’s when the circulation starts to shut down, and blotchy dark purplish-blue areas are visible.  Hers had reached her knees.  I ‘knew’.  I told dad that if he wanted to tell her anything he needed to get after it; she was dying. He figured she’d be fine (after all, she always got better, right?), but must have sensed something about my reaction. He asked me to step out for a few minutes. I did.   She was quickly going into a coma, and even at that point, I’m not sure how much she was hearing.  But it wasn’t just for her. I wanted HIM to have closure.  Then I took my turn.

During that afternoon, she went deeper into the coma, and I’d let her nearby brother know earlier that if he wanted to come, it was probably better to do so sooner rather than later; he and my aunt and cousin came.  I was also in contact with mom’s other brother, and only sister.  Mom’s mother was on her way back from  the winter in Florida and with the brother in Tennessee.  They were making plans to drive up here (near Grandma’s home also).  Her sister was looking for a flight ASAP.  A very few family friends also came; we didn’t make it broadly known what was going on.

Mom never regained consciousness, and I decided to spend the night at the hospital. She couldn’t tell anybody what was going on, and I wanted to keep track of how hard her breathing was (or wasn’t), and if she showed any signs of pain.  It was a long night. She did start having some respiratory patterns and sounds that indicated she was having a bit of trouble. I asked for some medication to be ordered, and the nurses were great about contacting the doctor (at about 3:00 a.m.) and getting her something. That helped her breathing ease up.

That was the same night Elizabeth Smart was found alive in Utah.  I’ll never forget that. One family was welcoming someone back home, and I was watching someone leave this earth.  I still remember that so clearly. CNN was all over it.  Mom would moan occasionally, so I’d move the chair closer to the bed and hold her hand and talk to her. I also let her know (whatever she could hear and  understand) that dad and I would be OK. If she wanted to keep fighting and come home, that was great!  We wanted her with us- but if she was just so tired of fighting all of the medical stuff she’d had go on over 20+ years, it was OK to stop, and  let go.  I also let her know that whatever had gone on in our relationship, everything was OK.  We were good.  It’s important to let folks know that the living will be OK, and give them ‘permission’ to be free.

She made it through the night, and remained in a coma.  Dad came back up in the morning, and we both stayed during the day.  Another couple of friends came by, but mostly we answered the phone calls, and just talked to each other.  Mom would only respond to discomfort, so we let her be.  I did agree to the air mattress the night before to make her skin less likely to break down- nobody knew how long this was going to go on (though the mottling is not generally something that happens until near the very end).  By that morning, her blood pressure was so low they needed an ultrasound gizmo to check it- so we didn’t bother with that other than once a shift.  The blood sugar wasn’t going to get fixed- so no point in making her wince and groan with each fingerstick and insulin shot; they weren’t doing much good anyway.  Had she shown signs that she was going to get better, I would have agreed to those things. At that point, it was just pain. She had no periods of even being remotely awake, and the mottling was getting darker.  She needed peace and comfort.

Dad’s friend had made it to Phoenix, and found the obituary mom had written for herself many years earlier, and left in her address book. He faxed it to his wife, who brought it to the hospital for us to have handy.  That was a huge help.

I was so torn about what to do that night. I didn’t want her to be alone, and dad wasn’t up for pulling an all-nighter (understandably at age 70).  I needed to get some rest if I was going to work the next night at 7 p.m.  But I really didn’t want her to be alone. The nurses were great, but it’s not the same as having someone next to the bed, watching.  I finally had to make the decision that I’d have to go home that night so I’d be OK to work the following night.  I hated that.  Dad knew I was struggling with that, but we knew that we could both be at her bedside within 10 minutes of getting a call from her nurse.  And we told the nurses to call for anything.  Anything.

Around 8:30 p.m. or so, her breathing got funky.  Like ‘here it comes’ kind of funky, but also somewhat labored, so I asked for the medication for her breathing to be more comfortable.  The nurse gave it, and it did help. Her breathing became less gravelly. (She didn’t have the ‘rattle’; it was different). At about 8:55 p.m., her breathing became sporadic, and I told dad this was the last pattern I usually saw ‘at the end’.  He was still hanging on to the idea that his partner of 46 years was just going through a rough patch and would recover.     I told him no. This was it.  And it was fast. Really fast when it finally happened.

At 9:00 p.m. my mom took her last breath. She was gone.  Dad and I were on either side of the bed, holding her hands. She wasn’t alone. She didn’t have any more pain or confinement to a body and mind that had been ravaged by disease and the effects of radiation.  She was free.  There was a brief moment a couple of seconds after she died when she looked like she had 30 years earlier.  I don’t know if my fatigue was making my vision wacky, or what- but I saw my mom. The one I’d known before anything was medically wrong with her.  She was at peace. I’d like to think that’s when she saw Heaven, and the Lord she loved so much.  She finally got to see the two baby boys that had each died soon after being born, that she’d never seen in life.  She wasn’t held back by anything.

On March 13, 2003, she was healed.

Diss Auto Gnome Ee Ya….. So there !

Dysautonomia.  Fancy word that means my autonomic nervous system (‘automatic’ functions; nothing that is controlled by me) is whacked.  I was formally diagnosed in 1996 when I flunked a tilt table test. My blood pressure tanked to 44/16, and I was still not totally unconscious. The doc told me that when I completely passed out (which had led me to the testing) my heart may have just taken a break for a second or two, and the thud on the floor jumpstarted me again…scary thought).

My blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and temperature regulation are all messed up. Pain and  being overheated are the biggest triggers, although having anything get the ‘fight or flight’ response going makes it go weird.  I’m not much fun when that happens.  Tipping over got me put on disability, which was (and is) the pits. I miss being a  working nurse (I keep my license active; I earned it, and it’s mine!).  I do not like being a patient (and I’m not that good at it, in spite of a fair amount of experience).  I tend to take care of any nursing ‘jobs’ I can when I’m a patient, and the nurses aren’t always that thrilled. I’ve gotten better about that…sorta.

Nobody is for sure what has caused this.  Some types of this disorder go along with other diseases, like Parkinsons or multiple sclerosis. Sometimes head injured patients have ‘brain stem storms’ which are similar, but those are generally confined to those with serious, life altering brain injuries.  Autonomic dysreflexia is similar. Diabetics can get autonomic neuropathy and have similar symptoms. Sometimes nobody knows.  Sometimes it progresses until the person dies (Johnny Cash), and sometimes it just sort of coasts along.  It looks weird regardless.

I was living with a co-worker in a house with no central air conditioning (in Texas) and hardwood floors when I started having symptoms that were enough to be noticably abnormal (i.e. passing out and hitting said floors about 10 times in two weeks). I had a bedroom window AC unit, but during the day, it was box fans or bust. In July.  I initially blew them off as ‘stress’. My co-worker (another RN) told me there was nothing ‘stress’ about what was going on- I had something physically  wrong, and needed to get it diagnosed and treated before I ended up getting really hurt.  Up until then, I bounced fairly well, and aside from some bruises and a concussion, I would just wake up on the floor, usually with my co-worker sitting on the floor next to me after being awakened in her room down the hall from my body whacking the floor.  She said I looked like someone was beating me, and since she was the only person around me on a consistent basis, it didn’t look good for her !!

So, off to the neurologist, who did some tests, and then to an electrophysiologist in San Antonio (60 miles from home, where I’d drive myself back and forth for the consults with a cardiologist, another neurologist, and the electrophysiologist…. basically they were looking for heart rhythm and brain abnormalities).   The electrophysiologist figured out the problem with passing out, and my neurologist back where I lived figured out some medications to help me keep working. Things had been pretty dicey with that, and my boss was ready to cut me loose. I was horrified.  I was tested for all sorts of things, but dysautonomia was the official word.  There are various types, and I seemed to have a mixed bag with neurocardiogenic syncope (I keel over if my blood vessels in my legs dilate and suck the blood from my brain (more  or less) , causing me to pass out), and some orthostatic tachycardia issues (POTS for the informed) where my heart rate goes up abnormally when I stand upright for too long.  Then there’s the strange stuff with heat that makes my blood vessels swell, and there’s no compensation with my heart rate, and I eventually keel over, after a very patriotic display of bright red cheeks, white around my mouth, and  bluish lips. If I don’t get it controlled at that point, I’m out for the day. It’s all quite exhausting.

It’s weird.  It’s misunderstood, and it’s taken my main sense of purpose – working as a registered nurse. I have been an RN for 27 years, and miss it terribly.  In some ways, it’s been good I’ve got that license to make sense of my own stuff.  But since 2004, I haven’t been able to work, and I do well to get the basic things dealt with at home. Laundry and cooking are quite painful, so it all gets done in ‘batches’.  But, it could be worse. I’m not in some retirement home.

At my last job, I was shipped to the ER between 10-12 times in the last 6 weeks or so that I worked there. Finally enough was enough (and the ER they sent me to was really snarky; if they didn’t understand it, it must not exist, so I was treated like the dreaded frequent flyer – even though I hadn’t sent myself there, my boss had. They were  very cruel at times).  My primary doc agreed that work wasn’t working. There was no way to know when I’d be more prone to having the episodes happen, and since I was (and am) in constant pain, there was always that trigger waiting to blow up.  If the thermostat was comfortable for everyone else, chances are I’d be burning up.  I now have an ice vest that I wear to leave home on the days I have MD appointments, or the one day a month I do major grocery shopping, which finishes me off for the rest of the day because of the pain that causes.

But I’m still relatively independent. That’s important to me. Even when I was getting chemo for leukemia, I’d drive myself to the chemo appointments and Neupogen/Neulasta shots. I wanted to do it on my own.  I’ve had to call my dad for enough stuff, that if I can take care of something, I prefer to do so (he would help in  a second if I asked him).  I rarely drive (have killed two batteries for lack of use), and know if it’s not a good day to go.  I shop in the middle of the night, so it’s cooler. I’ve had to make some adjustments, but that’s OK.

Anyway, if you see someone who has weird symptoms, encourage them to get help.  I got another 8 years of work from the right medications. That is priceless.  Don’t assume that just because you don’t understand it, it must not exist.  Too many people do that.  That can be dangerous.