Feeling Deformed… and Being Needed

I just got back from the endocrinologist’s appointment… they always weigh me there. I already know the number will be horrible before I walk in the door. I know it every time I look in the mirror, or remember the rings I can’t wear anymore, or wonder why I look like an orangutan (my chin has more than doubled).  I detest what I see when I look at myself, so I avoid it whenever I can.  But, bless the doc’s heart- she didn’t rag me about it.  My diabetes numbers are very good, my blood pressure was 98/60, and my blood sugar records were more likely to be on the low side than too high- so it’s not about too many carbohydrates.  And, I’ve stayed within 3-4 pounds for a  year.  But I’m not happy.  Not by a long shot. I look horrible.

I know that as a Child of God, I’m supposed to look at that to determine my self-worth.  I know that He has everything under control, and that He has some reason for this.  I’ve tried so many ways to lose weight, and it just won’t move. I’m afraid to get too radical, since I have a history of some pretty significant starvation and eating disorders. I don’t want to go back there.  SO, how am I supposed to learn to accept myself like this?   I’m unacceptable !  I don’t know what He can do with me like this to be of use to Him.  But I have to trust that He’s got it figured out.

My oncologist told me to just be thankful that I’m alive; many people with acute promyelocytic leukemia don’t make it… I know of two people by name who didn’t even know they were sick  until a day or two before they died from brain bleeds. One was 29 years old, the other was an 11 year old kid.  They both shook me up more than a little.  I was pretty sick in the hospital for six weeks… and initially I lost weight on the induction chemo. Then came the consolidation (arsenic), and maintenance (M6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate, and tretinoin)… 19 months total.  I blew up by 50 pounds from the lowest post-induction chemo weight (30 pounds from before the cancer diagnosis). It’s humiliating.  YES, I’m very thankful to be alive, but I feel like I’ve failed at getting my body into better condition.

My mobility is limited because of degenerative disc and joint disease, bone spurs, and fibromyalgia. My activity tolerance is limited by dysautonomia.  I’ve tried sitting exercising, and my heart rate gets to the point of making me dizzy and pre-syncopal.  I can’t get in a heated pool, or the heat will trigger my blood pressure to nosedive.  I’d slink under the surface of the water, and drown. Not helpful.  I can do some isometric stuff- but that hardly melts off the fat.

But I am thankful for a lot. I love my new puppy, and she needs me to be here for her.  She’s someone who notices if I’m around or not, and wants me close to her. I need that. I don’t get any sort of personal satisfaction from being a nurse anymore… I miss that a lot. I loved working, and am thankful that I had the years I did.  I am very thankful for the stuff I’ve survived.  I want to be here.  I’d rather hate my body than have it parked in a marble orchard somewhere (that’s what my dad calls cemeteries).  I enjoy many things (mostly on TV, or online).  I’m thankful that one day, I’m promised to have a new body in heaven.   I’ve requested a size six. 🙂  It’s just hard for now.

My puppy doesn’t care if I’m a size &^%&# or a size zero.  She just wants me here. When I call her name, she wags her tail as if I’d just given her the best prize in the world.  To her, I’m enough.  I’m hers.  I guess maybe I’ll just have to start there, and have that be enough ❤

Answering “Search Engine” Questions…

When I look at my site stats, I see the search engine topics that people are using to find information…. I’m using this post to answer some of those questions, in hopes of helping folks a bit ❤  I will edit at times to add more information as I see new topics.

Today, I saw a search for leg pain and leukemia M-3….  I do remember leg pain, with the chemo.  Several of the medications used had musculoskeletal pain as a side effect. ATRA and I think arsenic can cause pain.  I had more pain as the year of maintenance went on- I was on ATRA, methotrexate, and M6 mercaptopurine at the time.

I also saw a search for diabetes and chemo- my blood sugars went nuts when I was on chemo. They’re just now getting back to some sort of normal range.  It took several months and a trip to a Joslin affiliated endocrinologist for some insulin and metformin adjustments.

I just saw a search for ‘what could have gone wrong in the ER when someone dies from leukemia there’…. well, some leukemias are known for being really bad for causing ‘bleeds’ – sometimes in the brain (can be fatal very quickly), and sometimes in other parts of the body that can be really significant before they’re detected.  Also, leukemia is known for not protecting the body from infection- so someone could have a really bad infection and not be able to fight it- but if they didn’t know they had leukemia, they might not get help until the body couldn’t keep going (septic shock).  Leukemia can show up in ERs for the first time. Sometimes, the only time it shows up is during an autopsy.  😦

As far as people dying from APL in this day and age, yes. It happens. I know of 2 people in the last 6 weeks who died within 2 days of being diagnosed.  Because the blood clotting cells (platelets) are very low with APL when it is diagnosed, there is a huge risk for severe, and possibly fatal hemorrhages in the body or brain.  Those can be lethal very quickly.  APL also causes impaired ability for the body to fight infections. That can also cause death.  I was lucky to be diagnosed in time; some people are diagnosed at their autopsies.  But I was also very sick.  I got infections, and also tiny purple spots all over my legs and abdomen from low platelets. I got 13 platelet transfusions and 12 blood transfusions.   If APL isn’t treated it IS fatal. End of story.  If it is treated, but the disease is too advanced, or infections are too severe, death is a very real possibility. As an RN, I understood what was happening to me, but I was too worn out to really pay much attention…but I was SICK !!

If someone goes to the emergency room with advanced APL, it is VERY possible that the ER didn’t do anything wrong.  The disease was simply too advanced.  If someone goes to the ER because of severe headaches or decreasing level of consciousness (or coma), the brain bleed has already happened.  The ER is NOT the place for APL to be treated. They can identify lab work that indicates the probability of some type of leukemia, but it takes a bone marrow biopsy and specialized testing in specific labs (often not in the actual hospital since it is SO specific) to determine the type of leukemia. But the most an ER can do is identify the probable problem, and send the patient to the proper part of the hospital for complete diagnosis, and specific treatment.

Another search engine term I’ve seen more than once on my site stats involves defining what a ‘frequent flyer’ is in regards to an emergency room.  ERs consider someone to be a frequent flyer if they are in the ER a lot, and often if they are either looking for pain medications OR don’t have a primary doctor of their own. Frequent flyers are not regarded well by ER staff.  Most of the time (not always) the frequent flyers go to the ER for things that aren’t actual emergencies.  Many also visit several local ERs to either get meds or see a physician for something that is really not appropriate to have cared for in an ER.  They waste resources in many cases. They cost a lot of money (many also don’t have insurance).  SOMETIMES, the ER really doesn’t have a clue why someone is in their ER- they make judgements about the person that aren’t true.  But in most cases, frequent flyers are there because they made the decision to go to the ER and seek some sort of ‘care’.

For : ‘If I’ve had leukemia for over 3 years is it too late to fix this?”- it really depends on the type of leukemia- if you’ve had it for that long and hadn’t been diagnosed or treated, it sounds like a slower chronic form (if you have leukemia at all– there are other things that can have similar symptoms)- whether it’s myelocytic or lymphocytic requires specific testing.  It’s not over until it’s over !  See your doctor, and get it checked out 🙂

Whoever is entering ‘two nurses having sex’, ‘nurses sex’, ‘nurse sex’, or other inappropriate terms into the search engines- GET HELP.   It’s repulsive to have some pervert finding my posts.  If you wonder how two nurses have sex, they don’t have any special parts.  If you want some twisted porn site, then go to ‘porn’, and look there. GO AWAY.   Geez- you’re at it every. damn. day.   Get a magazine and go deal with yourself.

How to pronounce the Swedish cheese bondost spelled Bond Ost…. in English, it comes out like this :  Bónd Oost.  The ‘bond’ is more like booned. But not as long with the o’s.  If that makes sense- LOL.  😉

As far as recipes for Swedish sylta- there are some great Swedish recipes if you just enter exactly what you did…. how to make Swedish sylta.  I personally don’t like veal jello 🙂

For the person asking about the schnauzer waking up gasping and breathing heavily- and why dogs hold their heads up to breathe when they have heart failure :  The dogs’ hearts aren’t pumping oxygenated blood effectively, so they gasp to get more air… they hold their heads up because sometimes the heart becomes so enlarged (I saw my dog’s chest x-ray- it’s dramatic) it actually shifts the windpipe, and it’s ‘bent’.   Medications and prescription diets can help- one of my dogs made it 12 GOOD months. My dog who died 10 days ago made it about 9 months or so.

“Roof of my mouth is smoothed out”….. that happened to me when I got the induction chemo for APL (leukemia).  It went back to normal within a month or so after the last day of the induction chemo, and the consolidation and maintenance did not have that effect on my mouth.

A really important search engine term today:  ‘In ‘mission’ (remission) from APL leukemia for a year so won’t relapse’…. YES- you CAN relapse- that is why follow-up care is so important !  You didn’t go through all of that chemo for nothing !!  Keep following up with your oncologist !  You can relapse at any time, though my understanding is that after 5 years of CONTINUOUS remission, you are considered ‘permanent remission’ or cured.

To the bulimic who ‘pucked up blood clots’…. GO TO THE EMERGENCY ROOM.  Your esophagus could be tearing, which is fatal if not treated.  No joke. Get yourself seen by a doctor.  Suck it up, and get some help ❤  It’s scary, but you seriously could be getting ready to blow your esophagus (or stomach) and bleed to death.

OK…. here’s a favorite one (and it’s from today !!)  ‘witch side of the syringe is the cc side’ (sic)…  Here’s a tip. If you don’t know, put the syringe DOWN !!  If you’re in some sort of training to learn to use them, they will tell you.  If you have a legitimate reason for handling syringes, there is someone to ask- and it’s a valid question. But to ask that in a search engine search bar tells me something isn’t quite right, possibly !  🙂

To the person who entered “can you get disability for not being able to wipe your butt?” in the search engine, how about this- with that level of dumb ass you might just qualify.  Disability isn’t a joke. You, however, are.  Do you have any idea what being disabled actually means?  Do you have any human DNA? Or are you just so mentally disturbed that you don’t care?   If the lack of ability for personal hygiene is part of an actual disorder, then maybe…. just maybe you (or whoever) would qualify. Go ask someone who might know your situation, and quit looking up offensive topics.  OR play in traffic – the results of that may land you on disability.

Edit:  I guess I was annoyed that day 😮   Disability still isn’t a joke, and is a demeaning place to end up.  It’s not a career destination.  😦    I miss working every single day.  I miss feeling useful.  I miss having a sense of purpose.  I miss taking care of patients.  And, I even miss the idiots 😉