Vintage Baby Bottle Collection

Edit:  BECAUSE images were stolen from this post, they have been removed.  empolo.com has one shelf posted on “images” when you search for vintage baby bottles.  WorthPoint and Little Stuff are other sites that took my photos for their pages.  People on Pinterest have also been using my photos without permission.  Save the lectures about everything on the internet being up for grabs.  Decent people have values, and don’t take things without at LEAST giving credit where credit is due.

I’ve had a vintage  baby bottle collection for several years, and have found out from various sources (eBay, websites for collectors, etc) that there are a lot of us out here !! 🙂   My collection started via the realistic baby doll collection, when I wanted to get a ‘period’ bottle to put with a doll that had an outfit that was from the same time period as when I was born (early 60s), along with a vintage 60s infant seat for a complete display.  I wanted it to be a cohesive ‘set’. So, I found my first one at an antique store in Comfort, TX (near where I lived)… a 4 oz Evenflo glass bottle with the black ring and disc- perfect !  It was the black ring and disc that were the hardest to find, as well as the vertical Evenflo name on one of the sides of the bottle.

Then I started seeing vintage bottles now and then at thrift stores, as well as ‘hospital issue’ newborn nursery type bottles, which was what the doll collection was beginning to look like- a nursery!  The local Salvation Army Thrift Store manager would see things come in and hold them for me (I was in there many times a week- big entertainment in the small Texas town I was living in).  Thus began a bigger effort to find bottles that reminded me of babies I’d known, or times in my life, as well as my original dream of being a hospital nursery or NICU RN (that’s why I went to nursing school…that’s covered in another post).  That grew into wanting to get a bigger representation of how babies were fed over the many, many decades of bottle-feeding.

The next ‘dream’ bottle was one of the old white Playtex nursers with the pull-over nipple.  I’d known many babies who had those, from friend’s siblings, to neighbors, to babies I babysat.  I never thought I’d find one, when low and behold, my Salvation Army ‘dealer’ showed me an entire bag of the white ‘shells’, some caps and retaining rings, and a few of the old nipples.  Nipples are always the biggest issue in getting a complete bottle, as latex deteriorates over time.  First they discolor (not usually a display/collection issue), then they become stiff, harden, and start to crumble… not something I desire in my collection 🙂  I had several complete bottles  (minus the insert bags I could find at the grocery store- those hadn’t changed enough over the years to be an issue).  I later sold two of them via eBay for over $80 to someone who lived about 100 miles from where I got a bag full of them at a thrift store for 8 bucks.  One  was also sent to Switzerland.

Once I discovered eBay (in 2004), it was game on !  I found many more Evenflo bottles (different models), along with old Davol, Storck, Hygeia, Curity, Gerber, Nursematic,  and the various versions of old Playtex bottles of the old brands of ‘home use’ bottles.  I also got some really old hospital nursery bottles from Similac, Enfamil, SMA, Wyeth, and some others I have no clue about, other than some vague assumptions about the general time period they likely came from. A few have the paper labels with the actual dates/expiration dates (1960s).

I’d never had much interest in the bottles from the late 1800s, since getting decent nipples had been nearly impossible.  Well, eBay to the rescue again !  Someone in the UK found some ‘new old stock’ in the basement of an old pharmacy- meaning they were brand new nipples that had been forgotten, and saved in perfect or near perfect condition.  WOW !  I’ve been able to put together complete bottles with those, and have a history of bottle feeding on my shelves ( which are being rearranged to display them in less of a ‘sardine can’ manner). I still have a few of those left if I find a narrow-neck bottle that would be nice to have, and doesn’t have a nipple. Note the aqua box in the second photo- more on that in a minute !

I’ve discovered some interesting information along the way when researching the time period bottles have been from, and even some of the ways bottles were used to advertise anything from formula to diaper services to insurance.  I’ve acquired some odd triangular Evenflo bottles (that the Evenflo company couldn’t pin down the production dates for, though the font is a clue; we agreed that they were likely from the 70s).  I’ve also added some more recent bottles that will one day be vintage- and mine will be in perfect condition 🙂

The bottle in the aqua box is called a ‘banana’ bottle.  They didn’t  have nipples on both ends.  Both ends were open, and one would get a pullover nipple, and the other end was covered by the finger of the person feeding the baby (over a latex ‘barrier’) to adjust any flow rate issues.  Before nipples, pieces of wool, leather, or even wood would be stuffed in the hole at the feeding end, so the flow rate adjustment would be even more critical.  I wonder how many babies ended up choking on those pieces of wool, leather,  or wood.   😦   There were also early nipples that were black rubber- evidently they tasted more like present-day car tires, but were an improvement over risking the babies  inhaling wood, leather,  or wool.  Latex was a huge deal in improving feeding safety. 

I’ve started getting a bit irritated when I see listings on eBay that call something ‘vintage from the 50s’ that I was still using with pediatric patients in 2003.  The Similac (Ross) company used the same basic 4 oz bottle for decades… take off the label, and it’s hard to tell when it’s from- but when someone puts on a nipple from a different bottle that wasn’t on the market until the 90s, and I get a bit huffy.  I don’t like the false advertising.

I keep a list in my head of bottles I would still like to get for my collection.  Dairies used to give bottles with their names on them to families with new babies , back when milk used to be delivered to the door.  I’d love to find one from one of the bigger dairies around here (Muller Pinehurst). I see them on eBay now and then, but for whatever reason, don’t have the money at the time.  I’ve sold several bottles over the years, and am now going through my collection to weed things out a bit.  I’ve decided I don’t need 6 of any one size/shape/brand.  🙂

I’ve learned how the way the bottle is labeled narrows down when it’s from.  Evenflo changed from a vertical block type capital-lettering to a more ‘relaxed’ font with only the ‘E’ being capitalized, being read horizontally sometime in the 70s, and it’s the same font/labeling they use now. The rings and discs have also changed, from black bakelite to opaque black, white, and even brown plastic, to pastel colored plastic, to a translucent white plastic. For my collection, there is no excuse for putting a translucent disc/ring on a vintage Pyrex Evenflo bottle.  They just don’t work as a collectible ‘set’. Fortunately, I can still get the same latex nipples to complete Evenflo bottles I find, though I’m not sure I don’t already have the vast majority of their glass and plastic bottles. I have one of their disposable bottles from the 70s… haven’t been all that interested in those, though a mint-in-box set would be nice !

Hospital nursery bottles started the most recent update in the early 2000s. The last overall change came in the 1950s, when they were labeled with raised glass directly on the bottle (no paper labels), with Similac, ’20’ ( the number of calories per ounce), and the measurement readings . With the most recent update,  first Enfamil went to 3oz glass bottles, and Ross/Simlac went to 2 oz plastic bottles, then Enfamil also went to 2 oz plastic.  Those were the most common brands I’d see when I was working pediatrics (with the occasional ‘float’ to the NICU, with the preemies).  Good Start also was in the mix on drugstore shelves, but the big players were (and are) Enfamil and Similac. SMA and Wyeth bottles (when seen now) are always ‘recent’ vintage- those were basically phased out by the other two sometime by the late 1980s to early 1990s.

I keep spare parts from various brands on hand if I find something I didn’t know I was looking for 😀  There is also some collectible value in having the original packaging for nipples and parts, as well as the bottles- even if empty.

I’ve recently found a complete 8-bottle set from one of the last brands I’ve been looking for for  years: Sears.  It should be ‘in the mail’ any day now, and it’s truly a great ‘find’ for me. I was looking for one bottle, and ended up with a set that includes all but the nipples (Gerber latex nipples are a suitable replacement; not Evenflo). Anyhoo, I’m really looking forward to this latest addition.  I’m sure I’ll do more research on one of the baby bottle history sites, and see others I’m interested in- but that’s half of the fun…. the ‘hunt’ !

I’m sure this seems like an odd collection to many people. But I guess it just goes to show the diversity of interests we all have.  Some folks have shelves of salt and pepper shakers, teddy bears, inkwells, paperweights, ball caps, fishing lures,  and just about anything else you can think of.  This collection of mine came about somewhat by accident.   I’d just wanted that one black ring/disc Evenflo from when I was a newborn, then the one old white Playtex with the pullover nipple that reminded me about babies I’d known when I was young.

In the end, I’ve gained some information about how babies were fed over the many decades once something other than the breast was available. Back in and before the early years of bottle feeding, maternal death in childbirth was a huge issue and the baby had to get fed somehow, so the bottle industry began and literally saved lives.  It’s given me some insight to the struggle and risks associated with newborns and childbirth 100 + years ago that we don’t think much about these days.  It’s turned into more than just a bunch of bottles on a plastic shelving unit.  It’s taken me back in history, and awakened me to social, medical, and childrearing issues I’d never thought about.    Beginning  in the late 1800s (when adequate nipples were first being made), more and more families  didn’t have to face the tragedy of losing a child  by having a safe way to feed their babies.

Edit: As of July 29, 2015, this post has had 866 ‘hits’… most read blog I’ve done.

Pediatric Dream To Pediatric Nightmare

I went to nursing school for one reason. I wanted to be a pediatric nurse for the rest of my life.  I loved my pediatrics rotation in nursing school, and the time I spent volunteering on the pediatric floor on Sundays (also during nursing school).  I babysat a lot as a teenager, and worked in the church nursery for 11 years. Then the real world and real life happened.

I moved away from the Midwest to Texas in late 1985.  The hospitals there didn’t have pediatric floors at that time where I lived, so whatever the kid had wrong with them, they went to the floor that dealt with that problem.  I worked in neurology/neurosurgery, so I got the kids who were neurologically impaired/sick.  A four year old near-drowning was my first ‘real’ sick kid.  She’d never recover.  At four years old her life was over.

The next 16 years, I worked with various types of patients, including adolescent psych and general medical surgical patients in a community hospital.  In adolescent psych, it was rarely the kid who was the train wreck, considering what they came from.  I timed contractions on a 12 year old who was carrying her dad’s baby.  She was terrified (understandably) and would never be able to erase that part of her life.  I also worked with a kid whose step-dad bit his finger off because he got upset with the kid.  The kid was remarkably pleasant, and didn’t have a resentful or  defiant personality.  Wow. Survivor.

When I moved back to the Midwest for family reasons, I was thrilled to be offered a full-time job on a pediatric floor.  Once I’d finished orientation, I’d be floating to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) for any critically ill child, and also Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) with the preemies.  I couldn’t wait to get started.  After 17 1/5 years of being a nurse, I was finally getting to do what I’d really wanted to do.  My previous experience was incredibly helpful, so it wasn’t a wasted 17  1/2 years. Not by a long shot.

I hadn’t anticipated the horrendous circumstances surrounding the majority of babies and children I encountered.  The congenital limb deformities, ambiguous genitalia (can’t tell for sure if they were girls or boys), organ failure (and the skin color literally that of Kermit the Frog in bright sunlight), the horrendous abuse cases on babies as young as a month old, and other terrible accidents and neglect.  We did have the ‘routine’ tonsils and appendix removals, but those weren’t the norm- most of them don’t get admitted for those surgeries anymore.   Most of the kids that came through there were going to be permanently disfigured or chronically ill.  Some ended up in the local children’s nursing home.  And those NICU babies that had permanent disorders from being premature had to go somewhere when they got sick. Again.

A ten week old baby shouldn’t have a broken leg (in a tiny cast) because mom’s boyfriend got mad and tossed it off of the couch after twisting its leg.  A six pound, one month old baby who had weighed more at birth, and gone through heart surgery, shouldn’t be left in a room, tended to mostly by the household pet who would react differently when the baby smelled too much, thus alerting the ‘parent’.  A fifteen year old shouldn’t be twisted in muscle contractions, in a vegetative state due to some fluke illness years earlier.  A first-grader shouldn’t have the skin tone of a kiwi fruit because of a failing liver. A toddler shouldn’t have part of its scalp torn off from a very random accident involving a hot tailpipe, and not being seen when the car was backing up. That kid actually was lucky in a bunch of ways… staying alive with no permanent brain damage was pretty significant.  If it was on the news, I met the baby/kid in the story.

Babies shouldn’t be born three months early.  They shouldn’t be considered ‘big’ at four pounds (but considering the babies that weighed 1/4 of that, they were huge in that NICU environment). They shouldn’t be born with only parts of their heads formed, and not visited by their parents like the ‘normal’ preemies. They needed to be held and cuddled, too.  Even if they’re a mess.  They still can respond by calming down, and nestling into the arms of a stranger called a float nurse.  Don’t they deserve that?  Why did the charge nurse thank me for just treating that little partially-formed headed baby like a b a b y ?

A two year old shouldn’t have scalded genitals and buttocks because another boyfriend of the mom decided to dunk it in hot water, and hold it there. That two year old should have cried during dressing changes. The kid had no skin left on that part of its body.  The kid had already learned that crying was pointless.  That kid should have been laughing and smiling when interacting with adults- not looking for some sign of impending abuse. At least that kid was loved by the staff- and before leaving was guzzling juice and eating all the Cheerios he/she could eat.  The kid was very good at hollering and directing traffic in a high chair at the nurses’ station before being discharged to foster care.  That was a good thing. The kid got some ‘normal’ before leaving.  It’s sad that ‘normal’ didn’t happen until being in the hospital as a crime victim… at age two.

I hated when I got a call that social services was bringing a mom up for a supervised visit. This would be a mom that allowed her boyfriend to abuse her baby.  This would mean I’d have to be there to defend the baby. I hated when she showed up and was not much more than a kid herself, and had the ‘deer in the headlights’ look on her face.  She didn’t really know what was OK to do to a kid, or what her boyfriend was capable of doing. She’d probably been raked over the coals when she was a kid. That never excused anything, but it could explain some things. And for those moms, there was usually more hope in that she was teachable.  The interaction with the babies I saw was positive, when the moms bothered to show up at all. But mom was damaged as well.  It was lousy all around. I hated that my anger wasn’t justified by some monster showing up.  I just had more ‘kids’  to be angry about.

I ended up leaving for many reasons (one was my own declining health; another  huge one being the cut in hours in the summer when the kids weren’t in school giving each other all sorts of contagious diseases).  The abuse was a factor.  Injuring a child just didn’t mesh in my head.  I got very protective of those little kids.  Their crime was existing, and that’s not good enough to justify their reasons for being hospitalized. Nothing is good enough to explain hurting a kid.

Pediatrics was a good experience in that I got the experience, but overall it was a tragic mingling of chromosomes run amok, congenital mayhem, and sociopathic people in the kids’ lives.  I’m glad I worked there, and saw what is out there.  But my dream job ended up being a horrific showing of the worst of things that can happen, either biologically or by psychopathy, with an innocent baby or child on the receiving end.

I have a lot of respect for the vast majority of the nurses I worked with on that pediatric floor, the PICU, and the NICU.  It tore me up.  I know those other nurses cared as much as I did, but they handled it differently.  Most had their own families.  I was single and didn’t have kids, so there was no ‘balance’ of how kids should be, living at home.  I didn’t have distractions to make my life less one-sided.  It was all about those babies and kids.

Something for the nursing students and new nurses out there: You don’t see the full job when you are a student.  When you are new, everything feels crazy for up to several years (there is a LOT of information to put together to make you a fully functioning, competent nurse).  Don’t judge what you think you want to do based on what you think it really is.  Wait until you know your strengths before deciding what is the best place for you.  I spent 11 years working in a church nursery, and went to nursing school wanting to take care of precious babies.  I just hadn’t anticipated how they got to the hospital.  Keep an open mind about where you fit in the nursing profession.  It’s never how nursing school shows it.  I hated geriatrics in school, and loved my nursing home jobs as an RN.  I didn’t think much of drug and alcohol rehab or psych when I was in school, but truly enjoyed my five years combined of both.

You don’t know what you will like until you really know what it is you’ll have to do. 🙂